Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this class

public class MyViewModel {
  public MyClass Thing { get; set; }
  public int Id { get { return Thing.Id; } }
  public string Name { get { return Thing.Name; } }
}

I noticed when I bind it to an ASP.NET GridView, it automatically omits Thing, and for a good reason (ie. because otherwise it will only show the meaningless "MyNamespace.MyClass" in all rows)

I am trying to do a similar thing in this method.

public static string ConvertToCsv<T>(IEnumerable<T> items)
{
  foreach (T item in items)
  {
    if(item is not a native/.NET class) // <-- How do you do this?
      continue;
    else // If it is a string/int/bool/DateTime or something meaningful
    {
      ...
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How to determine whether a DLL is a managed assembly or native (prevent loading a native dll)? - check the highest scoring answer –  Jeremy Thompson Feb 14 '13 at 3:29
    
Thanks Jeremy but I am not talking about files or DLL –  aximili Feb 14 '13 at 3:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not sure about performance, but you could use somthing along the lines of

if(item.GetType().Namespace.StartsWith("System")) 
{
   // do stuff
}

Or filter before looping

public static string ConvertToCsv<T>(IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    foreach (T item in items.Where(i => i.GetType().Namespace.StartsWith("System")))
    {

    }
}

Edit: after a quick test the method above has some flaws, If your object is nullable (MyViewModel?) it will be picked up in this check (System.Nullable<MyViewModel>).

So perhaps you could use:

public static string ConvertToCsv<T>(IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    foreach (T item in items.Where(i => i.GetType().Module.ScopeName.Equals("CommonLanguageRuntimeLibrary")))
    {

    }
}

Another edit: There seems to be some issue with the last method also, But this one below is by far the fastest and most reliable, We just create a list of the System.Objects from the Assembly, and check if your item object is in that list.

private List<Type> _systemTypes;
public List<Type> SystemTypes
{
    get
    {
        if (_systemTypes == null)
        {
            _systemTypes = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetType().Module.Assembly.GetExportedTypes().ToList();
        }
        return _systemTypes;
    }
}

public static string ConvertToCsv<T>(IEnumerable<T> items)
{
    foreach (T item in items.Where(i => SystemTypes.Contains(i.GetType())))
    {
         // is system type
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Your latter is more elegant imo –  LiquaFoo Feb 14 '13 at 3:37

You would have to look it up in a predefined hash table or dictionary ... say by enumerating all the assemblies that are part of the .NET Framework SDK and storing the fully qualified name in a dictionary.

share|improve this answer

It's a bit later but may be can help someone running on the same problem. You can use the IsPrimitive property on this way:

If (typeof(Address).IsPrimitive)
   Debug.WriteLine("Primitive Type");
share|improve this answer
    
Caveat to this approach is it doesn't grab 'void' unfortunately. –  bc3tech May 21 at 18:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.