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I am trying to make a constructor that takes a string and constructs a date object. This is my solution so far but I am getting this error:

Constructor call must be the first statement in a constructor

private int m;
private int d;
private int y;
private String[] dateStrings;

public Date(int month, int day, int year) {
          m = month;
          d = day;
          y = year;  
  }

public Date(String s) {
      dateStrings = s.split("/");
      this(Integer.parseInt(dateStrings[0]), Integer.parseInt(dateStrings[1]), Integer.parseInt(dateStrings[2]));
  }

I realize I need this(...) before everything but how can I do that when I need to populate dateStrings first? How can I avoid this error? Note: to construct a date with a string it is in the format of "month/day/year"

share|improve this question
1  
this(...) should be the first line inside the constructor. – Eng.Fouad Feb 14 '13 at 3:56
    
But then how can it be contructed without first populating dateStrings? – Jon Feb 14 '13 at 3:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

this() needs to be called first.

Instead move the assignment to a private method.

private void assginValues (int month, int day, int year){
          m = month;
          d = day;
          y = year;  
}

If you also need dateStrings populated, you can build it in this method too.

Then call the method from both constructors. Make sure that the constructor accepting a String does not call this() since the shared method takes care of assigning the values.

You can also do everything in one line, but then you call split() multiple times which is wasteful:

this(Integer.parseInt(s.split("/")[0]), Integer.parseInt(s.split("/")[1]), Integer.parseInt(s.split("/")[2]));
share|improve this answer
    
Got it. Thank you. – Jon Feb 14 '13 at 20:39

The best way I've found to avoid it is to use a static factory

public static Date MakeDate(String s) {
  dateStrings = s.split("/");
  return new Date(Integer.parseInt(dateStrings[0]), Integer.parseInt(dateStrings[1]),  
     Integer.parseInt(dateStrings[2]));
 }

And for constencies sake, I might overload this and just avoid the whole weirdness of having one factory and one constructor.

 private Date(int month, int day, int year) {
      m = month;
      d = day;
      y = year;  
  }

 public static MakeDate(int mont, int day, int year){
      //You can figure this part out
 }

A nice bonus of this is that you can name these factories differently to make their intent clear. Probably not necessary in this case but it's a nice option to have, especially with more complex classes.

share|improve this answer
1  
This might look a little too good on homework. +1, tho. – anthropomo Feb 14 '13 at 4:07

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