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I have a base.html file that looks like this:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
<html lang="en">
<head>

{% block header %}{% endblock %}

</head>
<body>

{% block content %}{% endblock %}

{% block footer %}{% endblock %}
</body>
</html>

and I have a file, auth.html that extends this:

{% extends "base.html" %}

{% block content %}

[MY CONTENT]

{% endblock %}

which works fine, but I also want to have a separate header.html file that plugs into the header block above.

What's the correct way to structure auth.html and header.html in order to include both and to have both extend base.html?

I tried adding a {% include header.html %} line to auth.html, and structuring header.html as follows:

{% extends "base.html" %}

{% block header %}

[HEADER CONTENT HERE]

{% endblock %}

but that didn't work. How should I be doing this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You need {{ block.super }}:

If you need to get the content of the block from the parent template, the {{ block.super }} variable will do the trick. This is useful if you want to add to the contents of a parent block instead of completely overriding it.

Its burried in the template inheritance documentation.


Suppose you want to add extra stuff to the header block in auth.html. header is defined in index.html:

Your auth.html would look like:

{% extends "index.html" %}

{% block header %}
{{ block.super }} 
Your extra stuff, which will come after whatever was in the header block
{% endblock %}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, in this case my view is going to point to auth.html -- how would I structure the corresponding auth.html and header.html files to leverage {{ block.super }}? –  fox Feb 14 '13 at 5:52
    
sorry, in this case, I have two files, auth.html and header.html -- how do I get them both to extend base.html? –  fox Feb 15 '13 at 5:17

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