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I'm trying to import a php file containing a HTML script with separate CSS and js files into another php file which contains my header and footer. The header and footer are from a template which uses a very messy and convoluted CSS which basically has rules for everything in almost 10 different locations/files. When I import my php into this main template page, all the imported page's styles also inherit from the base template which basically overrides my stuff. Is there a way to enforce each php/html script to maintain their own styles without having to inherit from one another while they're being imported from one file to another?

Many Thanks

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You could try namespacing your css or using a pseudo-namespace technique. –  shapeshifter Feb 14 '13 at 5:42

2 Answers 2

How are you importing the files?

Is your answer is using include() or require() then the answer is no! When the html code is generated, all this will show it in the same page, that's what all the css and js files are applied to your html.

What you can do is add the css and js files to a file (eg: assets.php), establish an order and then import that into your main.php and resolve all the problems with the classes and ids on your html to avoid overriding.


EDIT: about CSS load order

The order in which you load your CSS files has very little influence in how styles are applied. What styles are applied to a certain element is determined by the specificity of the selectors used in the CSS rule. A higher specificity overrules a lower specificity, even if the style with the lower specificity is declared later.

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I used include(). Could you please let me know what you mean by establishing order? And how would the assets.php should be set up? Is it like an HTML layout with the js and css included in the head? –  Sam Feb 14 '13 at 6:05
    
@Sam: Is it like an HTML layout with the js and css included in the head? exactly, check update –  Tom Sarduy Feb 14 '13 at 6:19

you need to name space both your css and javascript to protect them from being polluted by your header and footer.

there are many name-spacing patterns out there.. but let me suggest a few:

css: for every page you import.. you can run a jQuery script like this:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    jQuery('body').attr('id','importedPagei');
} 

then when you import the css.. you should create a build script that appends the attribute body#importedPagei to every css you are calling

ie this is a sample of the css of the importing page before running your build script:

.style1 {
color:red
}

and after running the jQuery script:

body#importedPagei .style1 {
color:red
}

so let's say that before.. your header template had the following class:

//header.css 
h1 {
color: red;
}

and in your imported file you had

//importedFile.css
h1 {
color:blue;
}

then the final outcome in your old solution will have the template header style overriding yours:

//old final outcome
h1 {
color:blue;
}

but with the proposed solution above you will have (as mentioned before):

//importedFile.css
body#importedPagei h1 {
color: red;
}

and since you attached an id attribut to the body node of importedFile.html using jQuery, the html will look like this

<body id="importedFile">
  ..
  <h1>hello world</h1>
  ..
</body>

so in this case.. using css cascading rules.. the css selector of your imported file is stronger than that of the template.. and so the final style applied will be color: red

javascript: you can also use a build script to selectively import specific javascript files for specific pages..

another clean way is to use js.node modules.. the problem with javascript is that everything is in the global namespace.. there are some name spacing patterns that you can use.. but node.js provided a built in and very clean solution for it. and so you can have all the javascript in your final code but have node.js take care of compartmentalising it. it all depends on how much time you want to invest in solving this problem

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Great thinking. Could you please elaborate a little more on the build script? Sorry if this sounds like the wrong question but take me as a newbe in CSS –  Sam Feb 14 '13 at 7:44
    
hey Sam.. this is a very long subject in itself.. i'll give you brief one here.. but if you want more detail feel free to ask a new question on SO.. but basically when you create an application in general.. many times you want to create variables (think of env variables) that are specific to that application.. this is a very common concept for traditional programming (ie some things maybe dependent on the architecture of the target i'm deploying to) and so in the build script.. i take those differences into account. people new to web development aren't usually aware of these things.. –  abbood Feb 14 '13 at 7:50
    
but when you are building a large scale app with multiple targets and/or dependencies.. build scripts come into play.. that's all for now lol if you want more details please ask a new question and notify me here and i'll go into a lot more detail later today if you like –  abbood Feb 14 '13 at 7:51
    
for example in one of the companies i worked for we had an html5 based app that was localized for different languages and served different screen resolutions.. so in the build script we served different css files and js files for different combinations (we even supplied those parameters to the build script).. so for example the command would be build resolution 281 location japan.. now obviously we built the css to be as generic as possible.. but sometimes we had to use entirely different css/js files for different combinations –  abbood Feb 14 '13 at 8:39
    
Many thanks for your explanation. However, isn't a build script meant to be for a web application where languages such as Java and C# are used? In my case, I'm using a plain old HTML, JavaScript, CSS style. The only reason I used php is to be able to include the mentioned imported file into the header/footer page. Would you still require me to create a new question for you to elaborate further on the build script. If so, how would you like me to phrase the question? –  Sam Feb 14 '13 at 9:10

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