Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file with a bunch of different ZIP codes:

12345
12345-6789
1234567890
12345:6789
12345-7890
12:1234678

I want to only match on codes that have the format 12345 or 12345-6789, but ignore all other forms.

I have my regex as:

grep -E '\<[0-9]{5}\>[^[:punct:]]|\<[0-9]{5}\>-[0-9]{4}' samplefile

It matches on the 12345-6789 because the "or" clause matches on that particular one. I am confused as to why it won't match on the first 12345 since my expression should say "match on 5 numbers but ignore any punctuation."

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

An expression that matches your desired output is:

egrep "^[0-9]{5}([-][0-9]{4})?$" samplefile

The expression breakdown:

^[0-9]{5} - Find a line that starts with 5 digits. ^ means start of line and [0-9]{5} means exactly five digits between zero and nine.

([-][0-9]{4})?$ - May end with a dash and four digits or nothing at all. () groups the expressions together, [-] represents the dash character, [0-9]{4} represents exactly four digits between zero and nine, ? indicates the grouped expression either exists entirely or does not exist and $ marks the end of the line.

test.dat

12345
12345-6789
1234567890
12345:6789
12345-7890
12:1234678

Running the expression on the test data:

mike@test:~$ egrep "^[0-9]{5}([-][0-9]{4})?$" test.dat 
12345
12345-6789
12345-7890

Additional info: grep -E can alternatively be written as egrep. This also works for grep -F which is the same as fgrep and grep -r which is the same as rgrep.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense. I was trying to do it the opposite way instead of going from the beginning. Appreciated. –  Paul Feb 14 '13 at 7:12

It won't match "12345" but will match "12345a". The first clause needs to end in a non-punctuation character, the way you wrote it.

Consider Mike's answer; it's clearer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.