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I have a std::list of objects, say rabbits. Each rabbit has two properties: ID and weight. And in this list rabbits are in the order of ID. Then I use a std::priority_queue to store pointers to that rabbit list, in the order of weight.

Now I'm going to use this priority_queue to delete the lightest N rabbits in both priority_queue and original list. Question is: How do I delete in the original list?
Sample code:

#include <queue>
using namespace std;
list<Rabbit> rabbitArmy; 
priority_queue<Rabbit, vector<Rabbit*>, CompareWeight> rabbitSortByWeight;


for (int i = 0; i < 999; i++) {

    .....

    // each rabbit has different ID and Weight, codes omitted
    Rabbit rabbit(randomID, randomWeight); 
    rabbitArmy.push_back(rabbit);
    rabbitSortByWeight.push(&rabbitArmy.back());
}


// Now I'll delete N lightest rabbits in the priority_queue
for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) 

    rabbitSortByWeight.pop();

What about original list?

By the way, if I have a list, then I want to put it in priority_queue, is there better way than pushing elements one after another?

share|improve this question
    
You're rabbits are in an object vector, and a pointer priority queue. popping off the pointer from the pqueue is easy (just throw it away). Removing from the list is a bit more difficult, since as written it requires a linear search. Have you considered using iterators in your priority queue instead of raw rabbit pointers? –  WhozCraig Feb 14 '13 at 6:51
    
I don't quite understand how using iterators work...The priority_queue can give me the address of the object in my original that I want to delete, yet there is no way to delete it? –  Arch1tect Feb 14 '13 at 7:24
    
No worries. It was just a O(1) vs. O(n) deletion optimization. I think junix has a pretty solid answer. –  WhozCraig Feb 14 '13 at 7:35
    
There is an important issue with your code: You create objects on the stack and push references to them into your list. Unfortunately the objects are removed from stack after leaving the function or the loop. So your code won't shouldn't work anyway I'm afraid... –  junix Feb 14 '13 at 7:38
1  
@junix this will work fine. the Rabbits he's pushing are copied into the rabbitArmy container. And he's pulling the address of the last one from the container to drop into his pqueue. I don't see an issue with that. His list isn't a list of references (and in fact, no such thing exists in the first place unless wrapped by an idiom called a ref_wrapper, a struct/class that contains a reference). –  WhozCraig Feb 14 '13 at 7:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So here is the why Arch's code was not quite working, and I figure it is probably better to just show it to the OP. The missing link was the equality operator ==() for removal from the std::list<>. Without that std::list<T>::remove() has no way to compare whether the object sent is the one being examined for removal.

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <list>
#include <vector>
#include <queue>
#include <iomanip>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

// my rabbit (I don't have yours).
struct Rabbit
{
    Rabbit(int weight=0, int size=0)
       : weight(weight), size(size) {};

    int weight;
    int size;

    // needed for std::list<>::remove()
    bool operator ==(const Rabbit& other)
    {
        return weight == other.weight
            && size == other.size;
    }
};

// write to output stream
std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const Rabbit& rabbit)
{
    os << '[' << setw(2) << rabbit.weight << ',' << setw(2) << rabbit.size << ']';
    return os;
}

// functor for comparing two rabbits by address
struct CompareRabbitPtrs
{
    bool operator ()(const Rabbit* left, const Rabbit* right)
    {
        return right->weight < left->weight ||
              (right->weight == left->weight && right->size < left->size);
    }
};

// some typedefs to make life a little easier. first the list
typedef std::list<Rabbit> RabbitList;

// now the priority_queue
typedef std::priority_queue<Rabbit*, std::vector<Rabbit*>, CompareRabbitPtrs> RabbitQueue;

int main()
{
    // seed RNG
    std::srand((unsigned)time(0));

    RabbitList rabbits;
    RabbitQueue rq;

    // load up your rabbits.
    for (int i=1;i<12;++i)
    {
        rabbits.push_back(Rabbit(std::rand() % 10 + 3,std::rand() % 20 + 5));
        rq.push(&rabbits.back());
    }

    // show rabbits
    std::copy(rabbits.begin(), rabbits.end(),
              ostream_iterator<Rabbit>(cout,"\n"));
    cout << endl;

    // remove top N rabbits, in this case 2
    for (int i=0;i<2;++i)
    {
        rabbits.remove(*rq.top());
        rq.pop();
    }

    // show rabbits again.
    std::copy(rabbits.begin(), rabbits.end(),
              ostream_iterator<Rabbit>(cout,"\n"));

    return 0;
}

Sample Run Output

[11,17]
[ 6,17]
[ 8,11]
[12,14]
[ 7, 8]
[ 6,19]
[11,16]
[10,19]
[ 6,21]
[10,14]
[ 7,13]

[11,17]
[ 8,11]
[12,14]
[ 7, 8]
[11,16]
[10,19]
[ 6,21]
[10,14]
[ 7,13]
share|improve this answer
    
A million thanks! I need to spend some time to digest this... –  Arch1tect Feb 15 '13 at 2:23

Why not simply use the top method of std::priority_queue to get the value of the element about to be popped and use the remove method of std::list?

As example (assuming the queue stores pointers to the elements of the list:

myList.remove(*(myQueue.top());

or (if the queue is also storing references):

myList.remove(myQueue.top());
share|improve this answer
    
does this method support object? I tried rabbitArmy.remove(*rabbitSortByWeight.top()) It gives me compile error. –  Arch1tect Feb 14 '13 at 6:47
    
@Arch1tect firstly: write rabbitSortByWeight->top() instead of this dereference and point crap. secondly: What kind of compile error? –  junix Feb 14 '13 at 7:00
    
rabbitSortByWeight->top() doesn't exist.. –  Arch1tect Feb 14 '13 at 7:17
    
@Arch1tect Well at least my documentation says it does. Would you mind showing the code for this? Edit: Reviewing your code I see that rabbitSortByWeight is not a pointer, so rabbitSortByWeight.top() is correct and returns a pointer to the element. I think the problem here is that you are storing references in your list but pointers in your priority queue. Is there a special reason for that? –  junix Feb 14 '13 at 7:19
    
error: invalid operands to binary expression –  Arch1tect Feb 14 '13 at 7:19

There are two ways I would approach this problem.

The example assume a Rabbit class with a public id member.

1. I would just store all my Rabbits in a list, and sort the rabbits in place. If the rabbits are in the list in a particular order already - this might be a problem.

std::list<Rabbit> l;
for(int i=0; i<10; i++) 
    l.push_back(Rabbit(rand() % 10));   

auto comp = [](const Rabbit& a, const Rabbit& b) -> bool{ return a.id > b.id; };
l.sort<decltype(comp)>(comp);

int numToRemove = 3;
for(int i=0; i<numToRemove; i++) l.pop_back();

This will remove the 3 rabbits with the lowest ids.

2. I would skip the list altogether, and just straight up use the priority_queue. This way everything is sorted when you pop the rabbits out. Note that there are other restrictions with the priority_queue that may not fit your need.

auto comp = [](Rabbit* a, Rabbit* b) { return a->id > b->id; };
std::priority_queue<Rabbit*, std::vector<Rabbit*>, decltype(comp)> q(comp);

for(int i=0; i<10; i++) 
    q.push_back(new Rabbit(rand() % 10));   

int numToRemove = 3;
for(int i=0; i<numToRemove; i++)
{
    delete q.top();;
    q.pop();
}
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