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I received the following exception in handleRead() function from boost::asio::read() when I read and write more than 100000 of messages.

terminate called after throwing an instance of
'boost::exception_detail::clone_impl<boost::exception_detail::error_info_injector<boost::system::system_error> >'
what():  asio.ssl error

Implementation is below

Read Function

void start()
{
boost::asio::async_read(_socket,
boost::asio::buffer(_messageHeader, 8),
    _strand.wrap(
      boost::bind(
        handleRead,
        shared_from_this(),
        boost::asio::placeholders::error,
        boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred
        )
      )
    );
}

void handleRead(const boost::system::error_code& e,
   std::size_t bytesTransferred)
{
  if (!e) 
  {

   BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT( sizeof(MessageHeader) == 8 );

   Message message;
   message.header.fromString(
      std::string(_messageHeader.data(),
        sizeof(MessageHeader)
        )
      );

    boost::asio::read(_socket,
       boost::asio::buffer(_buffer, message.header.length));

   message.body = std::string(_buffer.data(), message.header.length);

   this->start();
  }
  else {
   this->close();
  }
}

Implemented message queue to write message

void sendResponse(const Message& response)
{
  std::string stringToSend(response.toString());

  boost::system::error_code error;
  boost::asio::ip::tcp::endpoint endpoint = socket().remote_endpoint(error);

  if ( error ) {
  this->close();
  }

  _strand.post(
     boost::bind(
       writeImpl,
       shared_from_this(),
       stringToSend
       )
    );
}

void writeImpl(const std::string &message)
{
  _outbox.push_back( message );
  if ( _outbox.size() > 1 ) {
    return;
  }
  this->write();
}

void write()
{
 const std::string& message = _outbox[0];
 boost::asio::async_write(
    _socket,
    boost::asio::buffer( message.c_str(), message.size() ),
    _strand.wrap(
      boost::bind(
        writeHandler,
        shared_from_this(),
        boost::asio::placeholders::error,
        boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred
        )
      )
    );
}

void writeHandler(
     const boost::system::error_code& e,
     const size_t bytesTransferred
     )
{
  _outbox.pop_front();

  if ( e ) {
  this->close();
  }
  if ( !_outbox.empty() ) {
   this->write();
 }
}
share|improve this question
    
What boost version do you use? Is it fatal error, i.e. what happens if you call asio::read again? Are the system-times of the client and the server more or less synchronized? –  Igor R. Feb 14 '13 at 11:34
    
I have defined messages in emum in between (0 to 100). but I think memory gets corrupted and I got the message Type of 1701996897, which is not from defined messages. In handleRead() function boost::asio::read() read this message type and then crashed. I am not able to understand why this memory got corrupted and I got the wrong message type. –  user1841046 Feb 15 '13 at 6:26
    
You likely have undefined behavior somewhere. There is no limitation of 100,000 messages in Asio. I suggest editing your question with a sscce that demonstrates the problem or running your code under something like valgrind. –  Sam Miller Feb 16 '13 at 4:12
    
Also as Bob mentioned mixing synchronous and asynchronous methods in a server is very odd, stick to asynchronous. –  Sam Miller Feb 16 '13 at 4:16

1 Answer 1

Looks like this is a client app? If this is a server, then you might want to rethink the synchronous read being done in HandleRead and make everything asynchronous. But, for a client app or a server that has few connections it is probably ok.

100,000 is a very interesting number - to people, not to computers. It is a number that suggests that someone somewhere has set an artificial limit. So, if your app is a client, then check the server code to make sure it is not closing the socket connection after 100,000 messages and vice-a-versa if your app is the server. Maybe there is a hard coded array somewhere that is dimensioned to 100,000 and throwing an error when the limit is hit which has a side effect of closing the socket connection.

Whereever you test for an error condition from an ASIO operation, add some logging info when an error is detected. At a minimum, write out some debug data to the console. For example, in your handleRead method, right before calling the close method, add some debug logging. In my app, I have a class that writes it out to both the console and a log file.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, It is a server. Does it make problem if we mix sync and async reads? –  user1841046 Feb 15 '13 at 3:57
    
I have defined messages in emum in between (0 to 100). but I think memory gets corrupted and I got the message Type of 1701996897, which is not from defined messages. In handleRead() function boost::asio::read() read this message type and then crashed. I am not able to understand why this memory got corrupted and I got the wrong message type. –  user1841046 Feb 15 '13 at 6:30
    
When I test this program with single client then this program works fine till around 800,000 messages and then crashes. But when I test this with more than 15 clients then it gets crashed with in 100,000 messages. –  user1841046 Feb 15 '13 at 7:12
    
Mixing sync and async reads would be a problem if you are using more than one thread. If there is just one thread, then it is probably ok. I would count each message received and each message sent. Implement try/catch exception handling on each ASIO I/O handler and log the info to a file or the console, including the send and receive message count. To debug your problem, try letting the program run in debug mode until it hits the message count of where it crashed and then step through the code and try to find the source of the error. –  Bob Bryan Feb 16 '13 at 19:28
    
Another thought. The crashing problem might not have even be in the socket code. What you might try doing is removing any calls that process the messages and just log each send and receive message to a file to see if it crashes. If it crashes at about the same point, then you know that the socket code has a problem. But, if it does not crash, then you know that the problem has nothing to do with the socket code and is most likely in the message processing code. –  Bob Bryan Feb 16 '13 at 19:29

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