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image of how my tree looks now

edit: The image above is how the tree looks now. I would like to make it look like a normal tree where each parent is between its two children.

How do I calculate the margin to put around each block in the included image so that each parent is directly above and between it's two children?

I am trying to display a representation of a binary tree in HTML where each generation has its own div (separated by dashes). Each block is also its own div inside the generation divs that is set to display: inline-block;. The blocks are centered because each generation has text-align: center;

In order to align each parent between its two children, the spacing is different from generation to generation. How do I calculate this spacing? Also, it there an easier way to do this in HTML than just adding padding to the individual blocks like i'm doing now?

Thank you!

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This looks fairly straightforward if a little fiddly to get right. What have you tried so far, where are you stuck ? –  High Performance Mark Feb 14 '13 at 7:47
    
I'm mostly stuck on the math. I'm not sure how much spacing should be in between each block so that it is aligned between its children. I know that the spacing must be some function of the number of blocks the row but I don't know how to calculate this. Any suggestions? –  user1056805 Feb 14 '13 at 8:01
    
Start your layout at the bottom row with whatever inter-block spacing you want. The x-coordinate of the parent of 2 sibling blocks is the mean of the x-coordinates of the children. This expresses the intent of your thinking much better than trying to work out the spacing level-by-level. Spend some time with pencil and paper figuring it out. –  High Performance Mark Feb 14 '13 at 9:11

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