Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am allocating some unmanaged memory in my application via Marshal.AllocHGlobal. I'm then copying a set of bytes to this location and converting the resulting segment of memory to a struct before freeing the memory again via Marshal.FreeHGlobal.

Here's the method:

public static T Deserialize<T>(byte[] messageBytes, int start, int length)
    where T : struct
{
    if (start + length > messageBytes.Length)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();

    int typeSize = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T));
    int bytesToCopy = Math.Min(typeSize, length);

    IntPtr targetBytes = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(typeSize);
    Marshal.Copy(messageBytes, start, targetBytes, bytesToCopy);

    if (length < typeSize)
    {
        // Zero out additional bytes at the end of the struct
    }

    T item = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(targetBytes, typeof(T));
    Marshal.FreeHGlobal(targetBytes);
    return item;
}

This works for the most part, however if I have fewer bytes than the size of the struct requires, then 'random' values are assigned to the last fields (I am using LayoutKind.Sequential on the target struct). I'd like to zero out these hanging fields as efficiently as possible.

For context, this code is deserializing high-frequency multicast messages sent from C++ on Linux.

Here is a failing test case:

// Give only one byte, which is too few for the struct
var s3 = MessageSerializer.Deserialize<S3>(new[] { (byte)0x21 });
Assert.AreEqual(0x21, s3.Byte);
Assert.AreEqual(0x0000, s3.Int); // hanging field should be zero, but isn't

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, Pack = 1)]
private struct S3
{
    public byte Byte;
    public int Int;
}

Running this test repeatedly causes the second assert to fail with a different value each time.


EDIT

In the end, I used leppie's suggestion of going unsafe and using stackalloc. This allocated a byte array that was zeroed as needed, and improved throughput from between 50% and 100%, depending upon the message size (larger messages saw greater benefit).

The final method ended up resembling:

public static T Deserialize<T>(byte[] messageBytes, int startIndex, int length)
    where T : struct
{
    if (length <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("length", length, "Must be greater than zero.");
    if (startIndex < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("startIndex", startIndex, "Must be greater than or equal to zero.");
    if (startIndex + length > messageBytes.Length)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("length", length, "startIndex + length must be <= messageBytes.Length");

    int typeSize = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T));
    unsafe
    {
        byte* basePtr = stackalloc byte[typeSize];
        byte* b = basePtr;
        int end = startIndex + Math.Min(length, typeSize);
        for (int srcPos = startIndex; srcPos < end; srcPos++)
            *b++ = messageBytes[srcPos];
        return (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(new IntPtr(basePtr), typeof(T));
    }   
}

Unfortunately this still requires a call to Marshal.PtrToStructure to convert the bytes into the target type.

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why not just check whether start + length is within typesize?

BTW: I would just go unsafe here and use a for loop to to zero out the additional memory.

That too will give you the benefit of using stackalloc which is much safer and faster than AllocGlobal.

share|improve this answer
    
@leppie -- thanks for the useful info. I'll check out stackalloc too. I have to cater for differing message sizes as the two teams can occasionally manage to avoid synchronised releases if we add fields on the end that the other end ignores. Similarly, if you don't require values, you can expect them and get zeroes instead, which is the case I'm trying to achieve here. –  Drew Noakes Sep 28 '09 at 13:45
    
@leppie, I'm leaning towards this approach. Could you go into some more detail as to why using stackalloc is safer and faster? Once I have the byte*, what would be the best way to copy into it? –  Drew Noakes Sep 28 '09 at 13:52
    
I've put together a version that works with stackalloc to populate an array on the stack. I don't think it's possible to get around the call to Marshal.PtrToStructure though, is it? –  Drew Noakes Sep 28 '09 at 17:00
    
@Drew: Nah, I also didnt realize generics sucked so hard when going unsafe :( If your types are known, you could generate all the 'templates'. That would keep it fast. –  leppie Sep 28 '09 at 19:31
    
Unfortunately this is a generic API that will deal with unknown and varied types (though all of fixed size.) –  Drew Noakes Sep 28 '09 at 20:37
[DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
static extern void RtlZeroMemory(IntPtr dst, int length);
...
RtlZeroMemory(targetBytes, typeSize);
share|improve this answer
    
The doscs say it's a macro. –  Hasani Blackwell Sep 28 '09 at 13:41
    
Dumpbin.exe on kernel32.dll says it isn't just a macro. –  Mattias S Sep 28 '09 at 13:45
    
@MattiasS -- I need to zero out at dst + N. IntPtr doesn't support arithmetic, so how can I address this offset? –  Drew Noakes Sep 28 '09 at 13:46
    
Can't you simply zero out the entire buffer before the Marshal.Copy call? That way, whatever part you don't overwrite with the struct will remain zero. You can do arithmetic on the pointer value if you cast it to a long and then back to IntPtr. –  Mattias S Sep 29 '09 at 10:27
    
The second parameter should be IntPtr instead of int I think. –  Simon Mourier Mar 10 '14 at 13:47

This will work fine on Windows:

namespace KernelPInvoke
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Implements some of the C functions declared in string.h
    /// </summary>
    public static class MemoryWrapper
    {
        [DllImport("kernel32.dll", EntryPoint = "CopyMemory", SetLastError = false)]
        static extern void CopyMemory(IntPtr destination, IntPtr source, uint length);

        [DllImport("kernel32.dll", EntryPoint = "MoveMemory", SetLastError = false)]
        static extern void MoveMemory(IntPtr destination, IntPtr source, uint length);

        [DllImport("kernel32.dll", EntryPoint = "RtlFillMemory", SetLastError = false)]
        static extern void FillMemory(IntPtr destination, uint length, byte fill);
    }

    var ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);
    try
    {
        MemoryWrapper.FillMemory(ptr, size, 0);
        // further work...
    }
    finally
    {
        Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I've never done this stuff in C# before, but I found Marshal.WriteByte(IntPtr, Int32, Byte) in MSDN. Try that out.

share|improve this answer

Yes as Jon Seigel said, you can zero it out using Marshal.WriteByte

In the following example, I zero out the buffer before copying the struct.

if (start + length > messageBytes.Length) 
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();   
int typeSize = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T));    
int bytesToCopy = Math.Min(typeSize, length);   
IntPtr targetBytes = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(typeSize);  
//zero out buffer
for(int i=0; i < typeSize; i++)
{
    Marshal.WriteByte(targetBytes, i, 0);
}
Marshal.Copy(messageBytes, start, targetBytes, bytesToCopy);
share|improve this answer
5  
Each call to Marshal.WriteByte will cause a transition between managed and native code and back, which has a certain overhead. Doing that in a loop can get inefficient. If you want to stick to the Marshal class, I'd try this instead: Marshal.Copy(new byte[typeSize], 0, targetBytes, typeSize) –  Mattias S Sep 28 '09 at 13:51
    
The other alternative I was thinking of was P/Invoke the LocalAlloc function and pass in the LPTR flag. –  Hasani Blackwell Sep 28 '09 at 14:51
for(int i=0; i < buffSize / 8; i += 8 )
{
    Marshal.WriteInt64(buffer, i, 0x00);
}

for(int i= buffSize % 8 ; i < -1 ; i-- )
{
    Marshal.WriteByte (buffer, buffSize - i, 0x00);
}

Could wright the last byte twice but I still think it will be faster than just using bytes.

share|improve this answer

I think the best way to zero out a buffer is this, if you don't want, or can't go the other way:

for(int i=0; i<buffSize; i++)
{
    Marshal.WriteByte(buffer, i, 0x00);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.