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I have the following code :

/** Width of each brick in pixels */
    private static final int BRICK_WIDTH = 11; 

/** Width of each brick in pixels */
    private static final int BRICK_HEIGHT = 12;

/** Number of bricks in the base of the pyramid */
    private static final int BRICKS_IN_BASE = 14;

public void run () {

    int LowerLeftSide;
    if (BRICK_WIDTH / 2 == 0)
    {
         LowerLeftSide = ((getWidth()/2) - (BRICK_WIDTH*(BRICKS_IN_BASE/2)));
    }else 
         LowerLeftSide = ((getWidth()/2) - (BRICK_WIDTH*(BRICKS_IN_BASE/2-1)));

eclipse marks the whole if as dead code. I initialize the value at the very beginning of the run method.

Thanks.

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11  
Please include the declaration and initialization for BRICK_WIDTH –  Philipp Feb 14 '13 at 8:08
1  
I think, you should give wider context. More code. –  Patryk Dobrowolski Feb 14 '13 at 8:08
3  
Is that first curly brace a typo? Because if not, I'm betting that's why. –  Brian Roach Feb 14 '13 at 8:08
1  
You should put BRICK_WIDTH / 2 in parentheses. Or loose the / 2 completely, you don't need it. –  pushy Feb 14 '13 at 8:09
1  
asking for a solution and posting unclear and incomplete ques - edit your ques –  exexzian Feb 14 '13 at 8:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Looks like BRICK_WIDTH is a constant, thus BRICK_WIDTH/2 is known at compile time and the eclipse knows which path will be taken, so the other one is dead code.

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+1 if condition never met. –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Feb 14 '13 at 8:17
    
Yes, indeed. Is there a way to circumvent because the program has to be independent of the specific value of BRICK_WIDTH. –  Mindaugas Bernatavičius Feb 14 '13 at 8:52
    
Circumvent what? BRICK_WIDTH will never change during execution. If you want BRICK_WIDTH to be evaluated during runtime you must not declare it as static final. –  Bombe Feb 14 '13 at 8:56
    
@MindaugasBernatavičius If you just want to suppress the warning, try putting @SuppressWarnings("deadCode") on the line before it? (Suggested by this question.) –  Rawling Feb 14 '13 at 8:59
    
Understood. The the "if" conditional will not solve the problem I have. I will try to find another way. Thanks –  Mindaugas Bernatavičius Feb 14 '13 at 9:03

As you are using capitals for BRICK_WIDTH I assume you defined it as a constant (final)? Then, unless BRICK_WIDTH == 0 (or 1 and maybe -1 assuming it's an int), BRICK_WIDTH / 2 will never be 0. Hence the code under if will never be reached.

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EDIT: Totally mispoke in my answer.

What is the value of BRICK_WIDTH? If it's zero, then that well always execute, and it will never go into the else.

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that's not true. if [BRICK_WIDTH] is zero, one would go in the [if] part and never in the else part. so else would be dead code. –  Matthias Kricke Feb 14 '13 at 8:12
    
BRICK_WIDTH doesn't have to be 0 to make BRICK_WIDTH / 2 == 0! 1/2 is evaluated to 0 too. –  Maroun Maroun Feb 14 '13 at 8:18

@oalsing you are right but in case of BRICK_WIDTH = 1, eclipse will say else block is dead code and comparing identical expression because values are hard coded.

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your IDE calls a code dead code when the condition you provide for the loop is never going to be true , thus the program never gets to use the code within the condition block .

Thus it is illogical to write some code line which is syntactically correct but is never going to be used . That is why as a convention its called a DEAD CODE .

you may encounter situations like

while(false){}
if(false){}

in your case

private static final int BRICK_WIDTH = 11;
if (BRICK_WIDTH / 2 == 0){}

since your variable is defined final thus compiler knows it will never change its value , thus the condition is never going to be true . So following the convention , its called a dead code .

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{   
int LowerLeftSide;
if ((BRICK_WIDTH / 2) == 0) {
     LowerLeftSide = ((getWidth()/2) - (BRICK_WIDTH*(BRICKS_IN_BASE/2)));
} else {
     LowerLeftSide = ((getWidth()/2) - (BRICK_WIDTH*(BRICKS_IN_BASE/2-1)));
}
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1  
Sorry, not sure what you're trying to get at here. Please explain your answer. –  BoltClock Feb 14 '13 at 9:43
    
Maybe a sintax error... –  John Feb 14 '13 at 21:37

The only time you will enter if, (I assume BRICK_WIDTH is a positivte integer) is when BRICK_WIDTH = 1;

Since a value / 2 never is 0, but in java 1/2 = 0, due to it's way of handling integers.

EDIT: I dont know why it says it's dead code, but this is a general thought.

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1  
1/2 == 0 is not Java specific, and ... this doesn't answer the question. –  Brian Roach Feb 14 '13 at 8:16

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