Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following command executes ghostscript on a pdf file. (the pdf_file variable contains the path to that pdf)

bbox <- system(paste( "C:/gs/gs8.64/bin/gswin32c.exe -sDEVICE=bbox -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -f", pdf_file, "2>&1" ), intern=TRUE)

After execution bbox includes the following character string.

GPL Ghostscript 8.64 (2009-02-03)
Copyright (C) 2009 Artifex Software, Inc.  All rights reserved.
This software comes with NO WARRANTY: see the file PUBLIC for details.
Processing pages 1 through 1.
Page 1
%%BoundingBox: 36 2544 248 2825
%%HiResBoundingBox: 36.395015 2544.659922 247.070032 2824.685914
Error: /undefinedfilename in (2>&1)
Operand stack:

Execution stack:
   %interp_exit   .runexec2   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   2   %stopped_push   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   false   1   %stopped_push
Dictionary stack:
   --dict:1147/1684(ro)(G)--   --dict:1/20(G)--   --dict:69/200(L)--
Current allocation mode is local
Last OS error: No such file or directory
GPL Ghostscript 8.64: Unrecoverable error, exit code 1

This string is then manipulated in order for the BoundingBox dimensions (36 2544 248 2825) to be isolated and used for cropping the pdf file. So far everything works ok.

However, when I schedule this script in Task Manager (using Rscript.exe or Rcmd.exe BATCH), or when the script is inside an R chunk and I press knit HTML, bbox gets the following character string which lacks the BoundingBox information, and makes it unusable:

GPL Ghostscript 8.64 (2009-02-03)
Copyright (C) 2009 Artifex Software, Inc.  All rights reserved.
This software comes with NO WARRANTY: see the file PUBLIC for details.
Processing pages 1 through 1.
Page 1
Error: /undefinedfilename in (2>&1)
Operand stack:

Execution stack:
   %interp_exit   .runexec2   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   2   %stopped_push   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   --nostringval--   false   1   %stopped_push
Dictionary stack:
   --dict:1147/1684(ro)(G)--   --dict:1/20(G)--   --dict:69/200(L)--
Current allocation mode is local
Last OS error: No such file or directory

How can I get over this problem and have the script run automated?

(The script comes from the accepted answer to that question)

share|improve this question
    
The bounding box is written to stderr, and 2>&1 redirects stderr to stdout. But this syntax is apparently not recognized by Windows. –  Vincent Zoonekynd Feb 14 '13 at 9:04
    
It is recognised by the Windows command processor, but this isn't being executed form the command shell, so the redirectiondoesn't take place. –  KenS Feb 14 '13 at 10:47
    
Does pdf_file contain the full path of the PDF? –  robertklep Feb 16 '13 at 11:46
    
Yes. You can verify it if you follow the link given at the end. –  George Dontas Feb 16 '13 at 13:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+300

The 2>&1 you add at the end of the command is sent to the ghostscript interpreter, not the shell. Ghostscript interprets it a file, hence the error. I used procmon to look at the process creation:

stderr redirection is treated as a file by ghostscript

To make the shell interpret it, you must prefix the command with cmd /c, like this

> bbox <- system(paste("cmd /c C:/Progra~1/gs/gs9.07/bin/gswin64c.exe -sDEVICE=bbox -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -q -f",pdf_file,"2>&1"), intern=TRUE)
> print (bbox)
[1] "%%BoundingBox: 28 37 584 691"                                  "%%HiResBoundingBox: 28.997999 37.511999 583.991982 690.839979"
share|improve this answer

The output of the device is going to stdout, the error is going to stderr. In the terminal these are obviously both sent to the terminal and displayed together,in the second case they clearly aren't and the stdout is going missing.

This isn't too surprising since you are getting en error message on (2>&1). This looks like it is redirecting stdout to a file, but there are 2 problems. Firstly you haven't supplied a filename for the output to be sent to, and secondly, you aren't running in the command shell, so the command processor doesn't do the redirection.

I know nothing about R, so I can't tell you how to do that, but you should start by removing the '2>&1' from the command line anyway. You might also like to consider using a version of Ghostscript less than 4 years old. The current version is 9.07 and has just been released.

share|improve this answer
    
I had the same problem with gs 9.06, so I started trying older versions. –  George Dontas Feb 14 '13 at 9:04
    
Removing 2>&1 does not help –  George Dontas Feb 14 '13 at 11:50
    
It won't help, it just gets rid of the error. Your problem appears to be that you are capturing stderr, while the output is being directed to stdout. You need to capture stdout, or redirect stdout to stderr (which is what &2>1 does in the command shell), or redirect stdout to a file and read that. –  KenS Feb 15 '13 at 8:37
    
Can you suggest a way to redirect stdout to a file? –  George Dontas Feb 15 '13 at 11:49
    
Not using R, no –  KenS Feb 15 '13 at 16:13

try this.

Set the output file using an environmental variable

Then use the %envvar% notation, which based on the link above would be %TODAY% which would be replaced with the file name friday. The -f isn't needed, but shouldn't hurt. If you want to route the output, set a second env variable and route it >%outenv%.

This way you can make a simple system call (see link for using variable rather than fixed strings),

Sys.setenv(envvar= "pdf.file")  
Sys.setenv(outenv= "out.file")
"C:/gs/gs8.64/bin/gswin32c.exe -sDEVICE=bbox -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH %envvar% >%outenv%"
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.