Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I have a .h file

test.h

std::list<std::string> RegisterList;

I want to access this list in 2 .c files

A.c

#include "test.h"

RegisterList.push_back(myString);

B.c

#include "test.h"

RegisterList.push_back(myString2);

When i compile this code, i get an error ld: fatal: symbol `RegisteredList' is multiply-defined:

What can be the problem ? Is RegsiterList is initialized by default in test.h which is leading to this problem ?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by dasblinkenlight, billz, Donal Fellows, Jon Egerton, Uwe Keim Feb 14 '13 at 10:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

Because you defined the object in the header file and violated one definition rule. Never define objects in header file.

If you want to use a global object, You need to declare it as extern and define it in one and only one source file.

share|improve this answer

Don't instantiate the variable in a header file. Always instantiate it in a code file, and refer to the instantiation in a header file.

share|improve this answer

You need something like:

test.h

extern std::list<std::string> RegisterList;

A.c

#include "test.h"

RegisterList.push_back(myString);

B.c

#include "test.h"

std::list<std::string> RegisterList;

RegisterList.push_back(myString2);
share|improve this answer

Your code goes through a chain: preprocessor -> compiler -> linker. Your problem originates with the preprocessor, but doesn't show up until the linker.

#include is a pre-processor directive.

Instead of compiling your .cpp file, the preprocessor synthesises another file from it, pasting in any included files.

The compiler then compiles the synthetic file producing an object file which contains data definitions, among other things.

You direct the preprocessor to #include the header file in two different .cpp files, which produces two different object files with the same data defined.

ld: fatal: symbol 'RegisteredList' is multiply-defined

This error message is the linker (ld) complaining that a global symbol is defined multiple times, and it doesn't know which one to use.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.