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Currently I have the following code:

        DecisionVariable[] attributes = 
        {
            new DecisionVariable("Var1", 2),
            new DecisionVariable("Var2", 4),
            new DecisionVariable("Var3", 1),
            new DecisionVariable("Var4", 2),
            new DecisionVariable("Var5", 5),
        };

but I would like to create them using a For loop:

        DecisionVariable[] attributes = 
        {
            for (int i=0;i<49;i++)
            {
                new DecisionVariable ("Var" + i, iValues[i]);
            }
        };

In the second version C# tells me that "For" has an invalid expression.

Do I have a typo somewhere or is something like that generally not allowed, using a for loop in a constructor?

share|improve this question
    
Thats because you have your foor loop in initializer. –  Jens Kloster Feb 14 '13 at 8:45
    
Initialize array first and after that do a for loop to add items in the array. –  Faisal Hafeez Feb 14 '13 at 8:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can't use a for loop inside a collection initializer. Use this code instead:

DecisionVariable[] attributes = new DecisionVariable[49];
for (int i = 0; i < 49; i++)
    attributes[i] = new DecisionVariable ("Var" + i, iValues[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice answer than. While I love LINQ and Range method, the style of simple for loop looks fine –  Ilya Ivanov Feb 14 '13 at 8:51
    
@IlyaIvanov: I am a huge fan of LINQ, but it's not always the right tool for the job. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 14 '13 at 8:53
    
@DanielHilgarth, could you please explain why not use LINQ to generate this array? –  Sergey Brunov Feb 14 '13 at 9:00
1  
@SergeyBrunov: Indeed. And I actually upvoted your answer for its second part. Because in that scenario I would also use LINQ. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 14 '13 at 9:19
1  
@DanielHilgarth, thank you! It was a good discussion. Glad we understand each other. –  Sergey Brunov Feb 14 '13 at 9:31
    DecisionVariable[] attributes = new DecisionVariable[49];  

    for (int i=0; i<49; i++)
    {
        attributes[i] = new DecisionVariable("Var" + i, iValues[i]);
    }

You could also use generics and do:

   List<DecisionVariable> attributes = new List<DecisionVariable>();

    for (int i=0; i<49; i++)
    {
        attributes.Add(new DecisionVariable("Var" + i, iValues[i]));
    }
share|improve this answer

You can use LINQ syntax to do this:

DecisionVariable[] attributes = 
                      Enumerable.
                      Range(0, 49).
                      Select(i => new DecisionVariable("Var" + i, iValues[i])).
                      ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Note: the second parameter of Range() is count (not end value). –  Sergey Brunov Feb 14 '13 at 8:51
    
@SergeyBrunov - yes, of course, thanks. Changed back to 49. –  Yakimych Feb 14 '13 at 8:54

It is convenient to use Enumerable.Range Method:

DecisionVariable[] attributes = Enumerable
    .Range(0, 49)
    .Select(i => new DecisionVariable("Var" + i, iValues[i]))
    .ToArray();

If the iValues array has the same number of elements you would like to have for the attributes array then consider the following code:

DecisionVariable[] decisionVariables = iValues
    .Select((value, index) => new DecisionVariable("Var" + index, value))
    .ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Your second query will not return the same result, but rather be ordered the same way as the iValues array (nothing an OrderBy wouldn't take care of ;) ). –  Yakimych Feb 14 '13 at 9:00

You can do something like this.

Class1[] c1 = new Class1[12];
for (int i = 0; i < 12; i++)
{
       c1[i] = new Class1(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: What is c supposed to do? –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 14 '13 at 9:20
    
It was by mistake added. –  Rahul Gokani Feb 14 '13 at 10:41

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