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I was curious on vector lookup vs map lookup and wrote a little test program for it.. its seems like vector is always faster the way I'm using it.. is there something else I should take into consideration here? Is the test biased in any way? The results of a run is at the bottom.. its in nanoseconds, but gcc doesn't seem to support it on my platform.

Using string for the lookup would of course change things a lot.

The compile line I'm using is this: g++ -O3 --std=c++0x -o lookup lookup.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <chrono>
#include <algorithm>

unsigned dummy = 0;

class A
{
public:
    A(unsigned id) : m_id(id){}

    unsigned id(){ return m_id; }
    void func()
    {
        //making sure its not optimized away
        dummy++;
    }
private:
    unsigned m_id;
};

class B
{
public:
    void func()
    {
        //making sure its not optimized away
        dummy++;
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<A> v;
    std::unordered_map<unsigned, B> u;
    std::map<unsigned, B> m;

    unsigned elementCount = 1;

    struct Times
    {
        unsigned long long v;
        unsigned long long u;
        unsigned long long m;
    };
    std::map<unsigned, Times> timesMap;

    while(elementCount != 10000000)
    {
        elementCount *= 10;
        for(unsigned i = 0; i < elementCount; ++i)
        {
            v.emplace_back(A(i));
            u.insert(std::make_pair(i, B()));
            m.insert(std::make_pair(i, B()));
        }


        std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::steady_clock> start = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
        for(unsigned i = 0; i < elementCount; ++i)
        {
            auto findItr = std::find_if(std::begin(v), std::end(v),
                                        [&i](A & a){ return a.id() == i; });

            findItr->func();
        }
        auto tp0 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now()- start;
        unsigned long long vTime = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(tp0).count();

        start = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
        for(unsigned i = 0; i < elementCount; ++i)
        {
            u[i].func();
        }
        auto tp1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now()- start;
        unsigned long long uTime = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(tp1).count();

        start = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
        for(unsigned i = 0; i < elementCount; ++i)
        {
            m[i].func();
        }
        auto tp2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now()- start;
        unsigned long long mTime = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(tp2).count();

        timesMap.insert(std::make_pair(elementCount ,Times{vTime, uTime, mTime}));
    }

    for(auto & itr : timesMap)
    {
        std::cout << "Element count: " << itr.first << std::endl; 
        std::cout << "std::vector time:        " << itr.second.v << std::endl;
        std::cout << "std::unordered_map time: " << itr.second.u << std::endl;
        std::cout << "std::map time:           " << itr.second.m << std::endl;
        std::cout << "-----------------------------------" << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << dummy;
}

./lookup 
Element count: 10
std::vector time:        0
std::unordered_map time: 0
std::map time:           1000
-----------------------------------
Element count: 100
std::vector time:        0
std::unordered_map time: 3000
std::map time:           13000
-----------------------------------
Element count: 1000
std::vector time:        2000
std::unordered_map time: 29000
std::map time:           138000
-----------------------------------
Element count: 10000
std::vector time:        22000
std::unordered_map time: 287000
std::map time:           1610000
-----------------------------------
Element count: 100000
std::vector time:        72000
std::unordered_map time: 1539000
std::map time:           8994000
-----------------------------------
Element count: 1000000
std::vector time:        746000
std::unordered_map time: 12654000
std::map time:           154060000
-----------------------------------
Element count: 10000000
std::vector time:        8001000
std::unordered_map time: 123608000
std::map time:           2279362000
-----------------------------------
33333330
share|improve this question
1  
The standard library containers doesn't have any constraints on time for operations, only complexity. You can check out a reference such as this one to see the complexity constraints for different containers. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 14 '13 at 9:20
    
I'm not exactly sure what you mean? –  bitgregor Feb 14 '13 at 9:27
    
Btw. added compile line to the above post –  bitgregor Feb 14 '13 at 9:28
    
Just for giggles, run it at -O0 –  WhozCraig Feb 14 '13 at 9:31
1  
This is because O(N*N) on 10mil items is no laughing matters –  Codeguard Feb 14 '13 at 9:48
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, you don't seem to clear your containers between tests. So they don't contain what you think they do.

Second, according to your times, your vector exhibits linear time, which is something that just can't be, as complexity is O(N*N) in your algorithm. Probably it WAS optimized away. Instead of trying to combat optimization, I would suggest just turning it off.

Third, your values are too predictable for a vector. This can impact it dramatically. Try random values (or a random_shuffle())

share|improve this answer
1  
Right, but turning of optimization with -O0 couldn't that bias the test? Since the different containers are probably optimized differently internally? –  bitgregor Feb 14 '13 at 9:49
    
Not sure about GCC, but in MSVC it's possible to wrap portions of code into specific optimization settings. You will need to optimize the part where you include headers, but NOT your code. –  Codeguard Feb 14 '13 at 10:10
add comment

I'm not at all shocked the vector tested better than anything else. The asm code for it (actual disassembly) breaks down to this (on my Apple LLVM 4.2 at full opt):

0x100001205:  callq  0x100002696               ; symbol stub for: std::__1::chrono::steady_clock::now()
0x10000120a:  testl  %r13d, %r13d
0x10000120d:  leaq   -272(%rbp), %rbx
0x100001214:  je     0x100001224               ; main + 328 at main.cpp:78
0x100001216:  imull  $10, %r14d, %ecx
0x10000121a:  incl   7896(%rip)                ; dummy
0x100001220:  decl   %ecx
0x100001222:  jne    0x10000121a               ; main + 318 [inlined] A::func() at main.cpp:83
main + 318 at main.cpp:83
0x100001224:  movq   %rax, -280(%rbp)
0x10000122b:  callq  0x100002696               ; symbol stub for: std::__1::chrono::

Note the 'loop' (the jne 0x10000121a). The "find_if" has been completely optimized out, and the result is effectively a sweep over the array with a decrementing register to count how many times to increment the global. Thats all that is being done; there is no searching of any kind undergone in this.

So yeah, its how you're using it.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not used to reading dissasembly, what part of the code is this? –  bitgregor Feb 14 '13 at 10:12
    
This is effectively the asm between the first clock start and first clock stop. (note the comments on the right as a hint). The core of the loop, however, is at 0x10000121a - 0x100001222, nothing more than an increment, then a decrement for the counter, then a test for zero to jump again or not. In other words, pretty much everything except the increment has been utterly optimized out. –  WhozCraig Feb 14 '13 at 10:16
    
Yeah right.. things changed when I used -O0 .. but then the optimization for the containers could be different too.. –  bitgregor Feb 14 '13 at 10:27
1  
@bitgregor But then again nobody cares about any time measurements in non-optimized code. Rather search for random values instead of incremental ones, or just use dummy += m_id instead of ++dummy. –  Christian Rau Feb 14 '13 at 10:43
    
Yes I've added random values and I also do dummy += m_id now.. updated the version in the main post. –  bitgregor Feb 14 '13 at 10:51
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