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I have to implement standard deviation and variance in C++.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <math.h>

class StdDeviation
{ 
private: 
    int max; 
    double value[100]; 
    double mean; 

public: 
double CalculateMean() 
{ 
    double sum = 0; 
    for(int i = 0; i < max; i++) 
        sum += value[i];  // Question 1. at bottom.

    return (sum / max); 
} 

double CalculateVariane() 
{ 
    mean = CalculateMean(); 

    double temp = 0; 
    for(int i = 0; i < max; i++) 
    { 
         temp += (value[i] - mean) * (value[i] - mean) ; 
    } 

    return temp / max; 
} 

double CalculateSampleVariane() 
{ 
    mean = CalculateMean(); 
    double temp = 0; 
    for(int i = 0; i < max; i++) 
    { 
         temp += (value[i] - mean) * (value[i] - mean) ; 
    } 

    return temp / (max - 1); 
} 

int SetValues(double *p, int count) 
{ 

    if(count > 100) 
        return -1; 

    max = count; 

    for(int i = 0; i < count; i++) 
        value[i] = p[i]; 

    return 0; 
}     

double GetStandardDeviation() 
{ 
    return sqrt(CalculateVariane()); 
} 

double GetSampleStandardDeviation() 
{ 
    return sqrt(CalculateSampleVariane()); 
} 

}; 

Here are my questions:

  1. How do I make sure value of double doesn't overflow and return to zero.
  2. How can I check I don't cross max value of sum i.e., double maximum value?
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4  
Please could you reformat your code? –  billz Feb 14 '13 at 9:27
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3 Answers

Are you sure overflow is a concern? Maximum value of double is 1.7*10308. You are summing squares, but even than you are still safe if your values don't exceed ~10150. Do you really have such values?

More serious concern is rounding errors. double keeps about 17 significant digits (52 significant binary digits to be precise). If you add numbers that differ in exponent, the lower part of the smaller only affects digits that are beyond precision of the result. To the extreme 1E20 + 1 == 1E20, because to represent as different numbers, this would require 20 significant digits and you don't have them. When it's possible that you'll have lot of small numbers and few big ones, it's recommended to add the small ones first.

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In c++11

double CalculateMean() 
{ 
    double sum = 0; 
    for(int i = 0; i < max; i++) 
    {
        sum += value[i];
        if(isinf(sum))
        {
            //handle error
        }
    }

    return (sum / max); 
} 

See:isinf

However, you could avoid the problem altogether (for mean calculation) if you iteratively calculate the mean for prefixes:

double CalculateMean() 
{ 
    double mean = 0; 
    for(int i = 0; i < max; i++) 
    {
        mean *= ((double)i/(double)(i+1));
        mean += value[i]/(i+1);
    }

    return mean; 
} 

Now mean can only equal infinity if values had an infinte value inside it to begin with

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1  
@leppie: "average" and "mean" are the same thing. However, the code in question than goes on to calculate variance and standard deviation, which involves square root of sum, which can't be similarly simplified and because it's sum of squares has much higher magnitude. –  Jan Hudec Feb 14 '13 at 10:02
    
@eladidan Thanks for help. Can you please elobarate how we can conclude overflow can only happen between 2 values in second function. I am not able to follow algorithm given here. can you please explain with simple example. Thanks –  venkysmarty Feb 14 '13 at 10:02
    
@JanHudec: Ooops, you are correct. –  leppie Feb 14 '13 at 10:03
    
@Jan: I was about to uncorrect myself when you beat me to it. I'm used to mean being the geometric mean:) –  eladidan Feb 14 '13 at 10:03
    
@venkysmarty: Simple. The second algorithm proposed, which as Jan noted is an approach we can only take for mean calculation and not the other algorithms, iteratively calculates the mean for prefixes. Meaning, during the i-th iteration we have the mean value for elements 1...i in values. This is because mean(v[1],...,v[i]) mean(v[1],...,v[i-1])*(i-1)/i+v[i]/i. Which is exactly what my second approach did –  eladidan Feb 14 '13 at 10:09
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double avg = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < max; ++i)
    avg += value[i] / max;
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