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I have a question about std::unique_ptr and std::shared_ptr. I know there are loads of questions about when to use which one, but I'm still not sure if I understand it correctly. I read somewhere that the default choice for smart pointer should be std::unique_ptr, but as I understand it, for my needs I should rather use std::shared_ptr. For example, I have:

class B;
class A
{
private:
   B* b;
public:
   B* getB();
};

A::getB()
{
   return b;
}

So basically class A owns pointer to object of type B and there's a method which returns this pointer. If I create getter, I assume that some other class can access this pointer and therefore it should be shared_ptr instead of unique_ptr. Am I right, or I don't get it yet?

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marked as duplicate by Xeo, Tadeusz Kopec, Jonathan Wakely, Ali, Shai Feb 14 '13 at 10:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
If you need to share a pointer, use std::shared_ptr. If you don't need to share a pointer, use std::unique_ptr. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 14 '13 at 9:37
    
1  
@JoachimPileborg still if he returns a bare pointer like he does there is no sense in using a shared_ptr –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 14 '13 at 9:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Short answer: depends.

It depends on if the pointer returned by getB may be stored/used somewhere while the owning A has gone out of scope. The difference is about ownership not about how many pointers you do have.

  • If the A still exists when you use the result of getB , you can store a unique_ptr and return a plain pointer. That expresses "A owns B, and no-one else does".
  • If the A might go out of scope while you are using/holding the result of getB, but the B should go out of scope together with (or shortly after) the A, store a shared_ptr and return a weak_ptr.
  • If possibly many objects, including the callers of getB, may hold on to the B and there is no clear single owner, store and return shared_ptrs.
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Let's assume for the sake of example that a pointer is really needed and just B b; doesn't cut it (maybe B is polymorphic, for example).

Scenario alpha

So, A is the owner of a B.

private:
   std::unique_ptr<B> b;

And getB provides a view of that B.

public:
   B& getB();


B& A::getB()
{
   return *b;
}

Scenario beta

A is one of the owners of a B.

private:
   std::shared_ptr<B> b;

And A can give ownership of that B to others.

public:
   std::shared_ptr<B> getB();


std::shared_ptr<B> A::getB()
{
   return b;
}
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1  
Scenario alpha does not account for the possibility that b is NULL. It depends on that possibility and on the usage of the returned ptr/ref, if getB should return a reference, a plain pointer or a weak_ptr, the latter of course demands a stored shared_ptr –  Arne Mertz Feb 14 '13 at 9:47

You return a bare pointer, not a shared_ptr, so making the pointer shared will solve nothing. Either return a shared_ptr, or use a unique_ptr. Try to think of how can possible shared_ptr be implemented and I believe this should make my point clear.

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I think you are right. If you would only story the B pointer as private member in A, I think I would use an std::unqiue_ptr.

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There isn't enough information in the question.

Smart pointers capture and implement ownership semantics. If the A object owns the B object, so destroying the A should destroy the B, then use unique_ptr. But unique_ptr doesn't make a good return type here. It would only be the member and you would still return a bare pointer.

If getting the B means the client can continue using the B indefinitely, then use shared_ptr, because that would be shared ownership.

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