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I have a program named "main.c" containing the main() that calls a method whose definition is available in other source file named "nim.c". I made a header file named "nim.h" that contains the prototype of the required method. This header file "nim.h", I have already included it in my "main.c". I am putting up all the files that are part of this program.

 //main.c
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include "nim.h"
    int main()
    {
         print(); 
         return 0;
    }
//nim.h
    #include<stdio.h>
           void print();
//nim.c
    #include<stdio.h>

    void print()
    {
         printf("hello !!"); 
    }
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1  
Have you compiled nim.c as well as main.c ? Without this, the compiler will have found a definition of print (via the include) but the linker won't be able to find an implementation of it. –  simonc Feb 14 '13 at 9:36
3  
You need to link with the object file, gcc main.c nim.o, or compile them together, gcc main.c nim.c. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 14 '13 at 9:36
    
Sir, actually when i am compiling nim.c it is giving following undefined reference to `WinMain@16' –  user2064676 Feb 14 '13 at 9:57
    
in nim.h you do not need the "#include <stdio.h>". I would put a "#include "nim.h" into the nim.c. Reason: if you change the definition of print(), and forget to change the declaration, the compiler will throw an error for you. –  Peter Miehle Feb 14 '13 at 10:00
    
@user2064676 actually its giving you that error at link time, not compile time, and it is because you have he wrong subsystem selected. Right click your project in your project explorer tree, select Properties, goto the Linker settings, select the System option, and change the target system to CONSOLE rather than WINDOWS. Then rebuild the world. –  WhozCraig Feb 14 '13 at 10:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

you have to tell the linker, that your executable consist of two object files (main.o and nim.o) along with all the burocratic stuff (like libc, win32, etc).

with gcc you would compile the C-sources:

gcc nim.c -o nim.o
gcc main.c nim.o <libraries> -o main.exe
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I used below command and all succeeded.

gcc main.c nim.c -o nim

try above command to build and let me know what error do you get exactly?

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My Program is working too. thank you Very much sir..... –  user2064676 Feb 14 '13 at 11:14

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