Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following IComparer defined for boxed RegistryItem objects:

public class BoxedRegistryItemComparer : IComparer<object>
{
    public int Compare(object left, object right)
    {
        RegistryItem leftReg = (RegistryItem)left;
        RegistryItem rightReg = (RegistryItem)right;

        return string.Compare(leftReg.Name, rightReg.Name);
    }
}

I want to use this to sort an ArrayList of boxed RegistryItems (It really should be a List<RegistryItem>, but that's out of my control).

ArrayList regItems = new ArrayList();
// fill up the list ...
BoxedRegistryItemComparer comparer = new BoxedRegistryItemComparer();
ArrayList.sort(comparer);

However, the last line gives the compiler error: "Cannot convert from BoxedRegistryItemComparer to System.Collections.IComparer". I would appreciate it if someone could point out my mistake.

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

BoxedRegistryItemComparer should implement System.Collections.IComparer to be used with ArrayList.Sort. you implemented System.Collections.Generic.IComparer<T> which is not the same thing.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You've defined a Generic-Comparer (IComparer<T>) instead of a Comparer without a type (IComparer). ArrayList.Sort() expects a non-generic IComparer.

Generic-Types can not be casted into their non-generic equivalents.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In case you have a situation where you don't have any control over the Comparer or the Sorter, here are two mini-classes which can convert between the two types (untested):

private class GenericComparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
    IComparer _Comparer;
    public GenericComparer(IComparer comparer)
    {
        _Comparer = comparer;
    }
    public int Compare(T a, T b)
    {
        return _Comparer.Compare(a, b);
    }
}

private class NonGenericComparer<T> : IComparer
{
    IComparer<T> _Comparer;
    public NonGenericComparer(IComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        _Comparer = comparer;
    }
    public int Compare(object a, object b)
    {
        return _Comparer.Compare((T)a, (T)b);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

An alternative to above post would be to have your comparer class implement both interfaces, then you can cast IComparer<T> to IComparer should you need both.

public class MyComparer<T> : IComparer<T>, IComparer
share|improve this answer
add comment
public class BoxedRegistryItemComparer : IComparer {
...
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.