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So i'm doing a class Exception for linked list, but i have no idea what to put it in. For example, if the user wants to delete an element that does not exist in the list, it will print out "Sparse Exception caught: Element not found, delete fail", or "Sparse Exception caught: sparse matrix empty, printing failed". Is it ok for me to do it this way? If so, how do i print out the message?

SparseException::SparseException ()
{
}
SparseException::SparseException (char *message)
{
if (strcmp(message, "delete"))
      cout << "Sparse Exception caught: Element not found, delete fail";
   else
      cout << "Sparse Exception caught: sparse matrix empty, printing failed";
}

void SparseException::printMessage () const
{

}
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put quotes arround the second message too. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 14 '13 at 10:06
1  
Note the constructing a SparseException object is not the same as catching one. Your "Exception Caught" messages are misleading. As others say, look at (and inherit from) std::exception –  Roddy Feb 14 '13 at 10:15

5 Answers 5

In my opinion an exception should always inherit std::exception or one of its subclasses. This will give you an idea of the interface you should implement. You need a what methods for instance(in fact what returns what probably your printMessage would print). Also if you really want to print your exception's what message, better overload the operator<<.

Inheriting std::exception is needed so that you know a catch(std::exception& ex) will catch any exception that your code threw.

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Adding to @Ivaylo post, the line

if (strcmp(message, "delete"))

should read

if (0 == strcmp(message, "delete"))
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Usually, exception classes simply contain information about what went wrong. Usually, they contain a string, because strings can contains about just everything you want "Writing 123 to file c:/a.txt failed".

In the simple case you present, you should rather use different classes of Exceptions (like a SparseDeleteException). Or, if you want to have more complex logic to get error texts, I would suggest to use a different class to handle "error id" -> "error string" conversions, because this is not the task of the exception.

Furthermore, the exception should have a method toString instead of print - the catching method should be able to decide what to do with the message.

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1  
toString is a Java thing. The tag is C++ –  Ed Heal Feb 14 '13 at 10:19

So i'm doing a class Exception for linked list, but i have no idea what to put it in.

First, consider inheriting from std::exception hierarchy (usually I inherit from std::runtime_error or std::logic_error). It will provide you with a basic class receiving a string message that describes the error and allow your client code to receive and handle your exceptions by catching a generic std::exception ref.

For example, if the user wants to delete an element that does not exist in the list, it will print out "Sparse Exception caught: Element not found, delete fail", or "Sparse Exception caught: sparse matrix empty, printing failed". Is it ok for me to do it this way?

Normally you should use a complete message (a string that can be logged) that describes the error, but not the type of exception (leave that to your exception classes hierarchy).

in your case:

class SparseException: public std::runtime_error
{
public:
    SparseException(const std::string& message): std::runtime_error(message) {}
};

Your queue:

// ... 
if (whatever1)
    throw SparseException("element not found, delete failed");

// ...
if (whatever2)
    throw SparseException("sparse matrix empty, printing failed");

If so, how do i print out the message?

Client code:

try
{
    // ...
} catch(const SparseException& e)
{
    std::cerr << "SparseException: " << e.what() << "\n"; // what() is a member
                                                          // of std::exception
}
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If you want to create a custom Exception, you'd better inherit it from std::exception or its subtypes like runtime_error or logic_error. Besides, it makes no sense to print message in the exception class, that's client's responsibility. You only need override what method, which returns detailed exception message(that said, runtime_error or logic_error's default implementation is usually OK).

Statement if (strcmp(message, "delete")) {...} makes little sense, too(actually it should be !strcmp(...)). If you just want to print different message, passing that message to the exception's constructor is enough. However, if you need distinguish exceptions, you'd better add some class like SparseDeletionException or SparseEmptyException that inherits from common base SparseException(which in turn inherits from std::exception).

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