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I've got (what I thought) was a very simple query on a MySQL database, but using explain shows that the query is using a temporary table. I've tried changing the order of the select and the join but to no avail. I've reduced the tables to their simplest (to see if it was an issue with the complexity of my tables, but I still have the problem). I've tried it with two basic tables, one with a "name" field, and the other with a foreign key reference back to that table:

a:
+-------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field | Type         | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+-------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id    | int(11)      | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| name  | varchar(128) | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
+-------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

b:
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id    | int(11) | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| a_id  | int(11) | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

And this is my query:

SELECT a.id, a.name FROM a JOIN b ON a.id = b.a_id ORDER BY a.name;

Which I thought was very simple... just a list of all records in a that have records in b, ordered by name. Alas explain says this:

+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+--------+------+----------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref    | rows | Extra                                        |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+--------+------+----------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | b     | index  | a_id          | a_id    | 4       | NULL   |    2 | Using index; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | a     | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | b.a_id |    1 |                                              |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+--------+------+----------------------------------------------+

It looks like it should be using the key on the b table but for some reason it isn't. I get the feeling I'm missing something basic (or my RDBMS knowledge needs brushing up somewhat). Anyone any ideas why it's using a temporary table for such a simple query?

share|improve this question
    
Could you give the scripts you used to create the tables you're using, including indexes and constraints? There might be something about the indexes and/or foreign key that is causing this. –  Robert Johnson Feb 14 '13 at 10:27
    
And this is a problem because ... ? –  Dale M Feb 14 '13 at 10:43
    
@Robert - I used phpMyAdmin - exporting the tables gives this: CREATE TABLE a ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(128) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id), KEY name (name) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci; CREATE TABLE b ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, a_id int(11) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id), KEY a_id (a_id) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci; –  fishwebby Feb 14 '13 at 13:23
2  
Not necessarilly, the optimiser has decided in this case that the temporary table is the best option. If you have an index on a.id b.a_id and a.name then there is no further optimisation possible. Bear in mind that the temporary table may be a memory construct - it is not neccesarily disk resident. If it is in memory then writing and accessing it is quick. –  Dale M Feb 14 '13 at 22:23
2  
As the table grows the optimiser may choose a different method. Optimisation considers the estimated row count. –  Dale M Feb 15 '13 at 20:24

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