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I have two interfaces :

interface IStudent
{
    string Name { get; }
    string EducationLevel { get; }
}

interface ITeacher
{
    string Name { get; }
    string Department { get; }
}

How would you design it in C# such that a an object could

  1. implement only Student (and don't have the teacher's properties)
  2. implement only Teacher(and don't have the strudent's properties)
  3. implement both of the interface without redundancy of the commone properties (Name)

Any thought ?

I can do 2 classes implementing directly the two interfaces. But for a person being both a teacher AND a student, I am going to have 2 different objects : I want only one !

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1  
There is no "redundancy of the common properties". If the properties have the same signature, they can share a common implementation - in fact, this is the default. (In C#, you can also use explicit interface implementation to give the two properties different implementations.) –  millimoose Feb 14 '13 at 11:40
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following is perfectly legal:

public class LearningTeacher : ITeacher, IStudent
{
    public string EducationLevel
    {
        get { return /*...*/; }
    }

    public string Department
    {
        get { return /*...*/; }
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return /*...*/; }
    }
}

The Name property is the implementation of ITeacher.Name and IStudent.Name.

If the implementation of the properties is the same in Student and LearningTeacher you can make LearningTeacher have a Student instance and a Teacher instance internally, making it effectively a decorator. Like this, you wouldn't have to repeat the implementation:

public class LearningTeacher : ITeacher, IStudent
{
    Teacher _teacher;
    Student _student;

    public LearningTeacher(string name, string educationalLevel,
                           string department)
    {
        _student = new Student(name, educationalLevel);
        _teacher = new Teacher(name, department);
    }

    public string EducationLevel
    {
        get { return _student.EducationLevel; }
    }

    public string Department
    {
        get { return _teacher.Department; }
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return _student.Name; }
    }
}

This is the only way, because .NET doesn't support multiple inheritance. You can only implement multiple interfaces.

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Hi, I don't want this because you are going to need an other class Student : IStudent and this will lead to dmplicate code with the LearningTeacher class –  Toto Feb 14 '13 at 13:49
    
@user2071634: What code will be duplicated here? –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 14 '13 at 13:51
    
I don't want a "normal" student to implement ITeacher. So you need a IStudent Implementation. This implementation will be the same for LearningTeacher and Student but in two different classes. Am I clear ? –  Toto Feb 14 '13 at 13:54
    
@user2071634: Please see update. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 14 '13 at 13:59
    
yes multiple inheritance was the issue. Your solution was what I was looking for. Does this pattern have a name ? –  Toto Feb 14 '13 at 14:04
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I would extract a common interface:

interface IPerson
{
    string Name { get; }
}

interface IStudent : IPerson
{
    string EducationLevel { get; }
}

interface ITeacher : IPerson
{
    string Department { get; }
}

Think about why your two interfaces have the same property. They both have a name, and why do they have a name? Because they're both a person. So there you have your common interface.

Classes implementing both interfaces will only need to implement Name once, because it's part of IPerson.

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Hi, I don't want this because a teacher being also a student is going to be represented as 2 differentes objects. –  Toto Feb 14 '13 at 13:48
    
Is the entity with the dual-identity a student-teacher or a teacher working on a master's degree? :-) –  Tim Feb 14 '13 at 13:49
    
"Classes implementing both interfaces will only need to implement Name once, because it's part of IPerson." - The same is true if you don't extract a common interface. You still will have to implement Name only once, see my answer. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 14 '13 at 13:53
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How about,

interface IPerson
{
    string Name { get; }
}

interface IStudent : IPerson
{
    string EducationLevel { get; }
}

interface ITeacher : IPerson
{
    string Department { get; }
}

You could use these interfaces in an implementation like this,

abstract class Person : IPerson
{
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

class Student : Person, IStudent
{
    public string EducationLevel { get; set; }
}

class Teacher : Person, ITeacher
{
    public string Department { get; set; }
}

class StudentTeacher : Person, IStudent, ITeacher
{
    public string EducationLevel { get; set; }
    public string Department { get; set; }
}
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Hi, I don't want this because a teacher being also a student is going to be represented as 2 differentes objects. –  Toto Feb 14 '13 at 13:47
    
@user2071634 I've expanded the answer so that you can see how the interfaces could be used in implementations –  Jodrell Feb 14 '13 at 15:58
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interface IPerson
{
    string Name { get; }
}

interface IStudent : IPerson
{
    string EducationLevel { get; }
}

interface ITeacher : IPerson
{
    string Department { get; }
}

IPerson P1 = SomeStudent;
IPerson P2 = SomeTeacher;
IStudent S = P1 as IStudent;
ITeacher T = P2 as ITeacher;
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Hi, I don't want this because a teacher being also a student is going to be represented as 2 differentes objects. –  Toto Feb 14 '13 at 13:47
    
Assuming this is homework - I think you've misunderstood the instructions. What you're asked for is to be able to have an object that is only a teacher, or only a student, while not having teacher and student both implement name –  PhonicUK Feb 14 '13 at 13:58
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is this implementation suitable for you?

interface IStudent
{
    string Name { get; }
    string EducationLevel { get; }
}

interface ITeacher
{
    string Name { get; }
    string Department { get; }
}

public class Person: IStudent, ITeacher
{
    public string EducationLevel
    {
        get { return String.Empty; }
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return String.Empty; }
    }

    public string Department
    {
        get { return String.Empty; }
    }

}
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Hi, i don't want this because a student is going to have a department property. –  Toto Feb 14 '13 at 13:42
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Can we distinguish these entities not ontologically but epistemologically, i.e. by their respective modes of thinking-behavior?

interface IPerson
{
    string Name { get; }

}


 interface ILearn
{
    Learn(  EducationLevel )

}

interface ITeach

{
      Teach(  Department  )

}
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