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I'm trying to insert some data into the table named rmas.

The table format is

|rcode|rname|vcode|vanme

Here, I set primary key for rcode.

When I'm inserting a record with existing rcode, it displays something like ORA-0000-1 unique constraint Violated..

If I'm using the following code, it displays the message even in the case of other errors.

catch(Exception e)
{
 //out.println("rcode already exists");
}

So, I want to catch that primary key exception only and display as "rcode already exist". Is it possible? If yes, then how?

Thanks in advance

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1  
look at your compiler, which exception does it throws. I mean the exception type –  asifsid88 Feb 14 '13 at 12:11

4 Answers 4

Exception is the parent of all the exception. If you have catch(Exception e) { } block written then all the exceptions will fall into this category. You need to find which exception the compiler is returning. Say if your compiler returns this exception SQLIntegrityConstraintViolationException then the following block would come

catch(SQLIntegrityConstraintViolationException e) 
{
  // Error message for integrity constraint violation
}
catch(NullPointerException e)
{
  // Null Pointer exception occured.
}
catch(Exception e)
{
 // Other error messages
}

In this way you can have any number of exception blocks. But make sure more specific exception types are first written and then the parent exceptions

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yes, this is i need. I'll check –  ling.s Feb 14 '13 at 12:11
1  
Look at the compiler the EXCEPTION type it shouts –  asifsid88 Feb 14 '13 at 12:19
    
Does it throw java.sql.BatchUpdateException –  asifsid88 Feb 14 '13 at 12:21
1  
I got the answer, thanks –  ling.s Feb 14 '13 at 12:30

You're catching an Exception, which is the superclass of all exceptions. By catching this you use the Pokémon Style ("Gonna catch 'em all!") which is, in general, a bad practice since you lose the ability to take different courses of action based on the particular exception that was thrown in that block of code.

Catch only the exception related to the constraint violation to avoid showing the message for every exception.

Why would you like to do this on a servlet escapes me, but I suggest you take a look at the architecture of your solution and provide a layered approach, catching this exceptions in the Persistence tier and returning your own result code, that defines which message should be displayed to the user.

Note: I used Result code and not Error code to allow returning a code for a successful operation.

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I wouldn't have any such code in a servlet. I think it belongs in a class that lives in your persistence tier. Servlets are HTTP listeners; they shouldn't have database code in them.

Have your interface-based persistence class catch that exception and handle it appropriately. Write an inteface-based service that uses the persistence class to fulfill the use case. Let the servlet call the service and figure out what to display next based on what happens.

It's called a layered architecture. I'd recommend it highly.

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catch (RollbackException e) {
  if(e.getMessage().indexOf("unique constraint")!=0){
  return "PrimaryKeyExeption";
}
  return null;
}

Catch the primary key exception

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1  
some more specific please –  ling.s Feb 14 '13 at 12:09

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