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What is the difference between a framework and a library?

I always thought of a library as a set of objects and functions that is focussed around solving a particular problem or around a specific area of application development (i.e. database access); a framework on the other hand is a collection of libraries centred around a particular methodology (i.e. MVC) and covers all areas of application development.

Thanks for the answers! Links extracted from some of the answers below:

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possible duplicate of What is the difference between a class library and a framework –  vba4all Feb 25 at 8:28

18 Answers 18

up vote 71 down vote accepted

Actually these terms can mean a lot of different things depending the context they are used.

For example, on Mac OS X frameworks are just libraries, packed into a bundle. Within the bundle you will find an actual dynamic library (libWhatever.dylib). The difference between a bare library and the framework on Mac is that a framework can contain multiple different versions of the library. It can contain extra resources (images, localized strings, XML data files, UI objects, etc.) and unless the framework is released to public, it usually contains the necessary .h files you need to use the library.

Thus you have everything within a single package you need to use the library in your application (a C/C++/Objective-C library without .h files is pretty useless, unless you write them yourself according to some library documentation), instead of a bunch of files to move around (a Mac bundle is just a directory on the Unix level, but the UI treats it like a single file, pretty much like you have JAR files in Java and when you click it, you usually don't see what's inside, unless you explicitly select to show the content).

Wikipedia calls framework a "buzzword". It defines a software framework as

A software framework is a re-usable design for a software system (or subsystem). A software framework may include support programs, code libraries, a scripting language, or other software to help develop and glue together the different components of a software project. Various parts of the framework may be exposed through an API..

So I'd say a library is just that, "a library". It is a collection of objects/functions/methods (depending on your language) and your application "links" against it and thus can use the objects/functions/methods. It is basically a file containing re-usable code that can usually be shared among multiple applications (you don't have to write the same code over and over again).

A framework can be everything you use in application development. It can be a library, a collection of many libraries, a collection of scripts, or any piece of software you need to create your application. Framework is just a very vague term.

Here's an article about some guy regarding the topic "Library vs. Framework". I personally think this article is highly arguable. It's not wrong what he's saying there, however, he's just picking out one of the multiple definitions of framework and compares that to the classic definition of library. E.g. he says you need a framework for sub-classing. Really? I can have an object defined in a library, I can link against it, and sub-class it in my code. I don't see how I need a "framework" for that. In some way he rather explains how the term framework is used nowadays. It's just a hyped word, as I said before. Some companies release just a normal library (in any sense of a classical library) and call it a "framework" because it sounds more fancy.

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A library performs specific, well-defined operations.

A framework is a skeleton where the application defines the "meat" of the operation by filling out the skeleton. The skeleton still has code to link up the parts but the most important work is done by the application.

Examples of libraries: Network protocols, compression, image manipulation, string utilities, regular expression evaluation, math. Operations are self-contained.

Examples of frameworks: Web application system, Plug-in manager, GUI system. The framework defines the concept but the application defines the fundamental functionality that end-users care about.

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Superb answer clears it all! –  Sameer Sawla Jan 18 at 14:45
    
+1 for real examples. Btw, do you mind clarifying what do you mean by a "web application system"? –  Pacerier Aug 27 at 3:35

I think that the main difference is that frameworks follow the "Hollywood principle", i.e. "don't call us, we'll call you."

According to Martin Fowler:

A library is essentially a set of functions that you can call, these days usually organized into classes. Each call does some work and returns control to the client.

A framework embodies some abstract design, with more behavior built in. In order to use it you need to insert your behavior into various places in the framework either by subclassing or by plugging in your own classes. The framework's code then calls your code at these points.

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You call Library.

Framework calls you.


図書館 助け
足場が痛い
多くの涙

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35  
In Soviet Russia, does Library call you and you call framework? –  Thomas Owens Oct 24 '08 at 14:31
10  
+1 for the (almost unbelievable) conciseness of your answer... only 6 words! ;) –  stakx Oct 19 '12 at 21:32
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Library ~ # Framework ~ $ –  Eddie B Oct 28 '12 at 21:29
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@EddieB i assume that is a language i don't recognize? –  Ian Boyd Oct 28 '12 at 23:10
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@DerekTomes BTW: i added haiku form. –  Ian Boyd Jun 1 at 20:12

As I've always described it:

A Library is a tool.

A Framework is a way of life.

A library you can use whatever tiny part helps you. A Framework you must commit your entire project to.

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You raised a good point against using frameworks. –  Pacerier Aug 27 at 3:42

I like Cohens answer, but a more technical definition is: Your code calls a library. A framework calls your code. For example a GUI framework calls your code through event-handlers. A web framework calls your code through some request-response model.

This is also called inversion of control - suddenly the framework decides when and how to execute you code rather than the other way around as with libraries. This means that a framework also have a much larger impact on how you have to structure your code.

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Great "Simple" description: inversion of control –  Lucy Aug 13 at 22:17

I forget where I saw this definition, but I think it's pretty nice.

A library is a module that you call from your code, and a framework is a module which calls your code.

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But libc includes qsort(), which calls your code. I don't think that makes libc a framework. –  Mark Baker Sep 29 '08 at 14:49

Library:

It is just a collection of routines(functional programming) or class definitions(object oriented programming). The reason behind is simply code reuse, i.e. get the code that has already been written by other developers. The classes or routines normally define specific operations in a domain specific area. For example, there are some libraries of mathematics which can let developer just call the function without redo the implementation of how an algorithm works.

Framework:

In framework, all the control flow is already there, and there’s a bunch of predefined white spots that we should fill out with our code. A framework is normally more complex. It defines a skeleton where the application defines its own features to fill out the skeleton. In this way, your code will be called by the framework when appropriately. The benefit is that developers do not need to worry about if a design is good or not, but just about implementing domain specific functions.

Library,Framework and your Code image representation:

Library,Framework and your Code image relation

KeyDifference:

The key difference between a library and a framework is “Inversion of Control”. When you call a method from a library, you are in control. But with a framework, the control is inverted: the framework calls you.

Relation:

Both of them defined API, which is used for programmers to use. To put those together, we can think of a library as a certain function of an application, a framework as the skeleton of the application, and an API is connector to put those together. A typical development process normally starts with a framework, and fill out functions defined in libraries through API.

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Inversion of Control Great in-depth explanation! –  Lucy Aug 13 at 22:21

here is linked a bitter article by Joel Spolsky, but contains a good distinction between toolboxes, libraries, frameworks and such

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A library implements functionality for a narrowly-scoped purpose whereas a framework tends to be a collection of libraries providing support for a wider range of features. For example, the library System.Drawing.dll handles drawing functionality, but is only one part of the overall .NET framework.

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Good point, that a framework can contain libraries. So, it can be both, a framework in the first and a library in the second instance. As this is the case for many web frameworks like Apache Wicket, that define the processing cycle but also provide a big set of classes that implement concrete ui components. –  OneWorld Oct 2 '12 at 11:01

I think you pinned down quite well the difference: the framework provides a frame in which we do our work... Somehow, it is more "constraining" than a simple library.
The framework is also supposed to add consistency to a set of libraries.

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Your interpretation sounds pretty good to me... A library could be anything that's compiled and self-contained for re-use in other code, there's literally no restriction on its content.

A framework on the other hand is expected to have a range of facilities for use in some specific arena of application development, just like your example, MVC.

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Library - Any set of classes or components that can be used as the client deems fit to accomplish a certain task.
Framework - mandates certain guidelines for you to "plug-in" into something bigger than you. You merely provide the pieces specific to your application/requirements in a published-required manner, so that 'the framwework can make your life easy'

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I don´t remember the source of this answer (I guess I found it in a .ppt in the internet), but the answer is quite simple.

A Library and a Framework are a set of classes, modules and/or code (depending of the programing language) that can be used in your applications and helps you to solve an especific "problem".

That problem can be log or debuging info in an application, draw charts, create an specific file format (html, pdf, xls), connect to a data base, create a part of an application or a complete application or a code applied to a Design Pattern.

You can have a Framework or a Library to solve all these problems and many more, normaly the frameworks helps you to solve more complex or bigger problems, but that a consecuence of their main difference, not a main definition for both.

The main difference betwen a Library and a Framework is the dependency betwen their own code, in oder words to use a Framework you need to use almost all the classes, modules or code in the FW, but to use a Library you can use one or few classes, modules or code in the lib in your own application

This means that if a Framework has, for example has 50 classes in order to use the framework in an app you need to use, let said, 10-15 or more classes in your code, because that is how is designed a Framework, some classes (objects of that classes) are inputs/parameters for methods in other classes in the framework. See the .NET framework, Spring, or any MVC framework.

But for example a log library, you can just use a Log class in your code, and helps you to solve the "logging problem", that doesn´t mean that the log library doesn't have more classes in his code, like classes to handle files, handle screen outputs, or even data bases, but you never touch/use that classes in your code, and that is the reason of why is a library and not a framework.

And also there are more categories than Frameworks and Libraries, but that is off topic.

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This is how I think of it (and have seen rationalized by others):

A library is something contained within your code. And a framework is a container for your application.

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I think library is a set of utilities to reach a goal (for example, sockets, cryptography, etc). Framework is library + RUNTIME EINVIRONNEMENT. For example, ASP.NET is a framework: it accepts HTTP requests, create page object, invoke lyfe cicle events, etc. Framework does all this, you write a bit of code which will be run at a specific time of the life cycle of current request!

Anyway, very interestering question!

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Libraries are for ease of use and efficiency.You can say for example that Zend library helps us accomplish different tasks with its well defined classes and functions.While a framework is something that usually forces a certain way of implementing a solution, like MVC(Model-view-controller)(reference). It is a well-defined system for the distribution of tasks like in MVC.Model contains database side,Views are for UI Interface, and controllers are for Business logic.

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Inversion of Control is a key part of what makes a framework different to a library. A library is essentially a set of functions that you can call, these days usually organized into classes. Each call does some work and returns control to the client.

A framework embodies some abstract design, with more behavior built in. In order to use it you need to insert your behavior into various places in the framework either by sub-classing or by plugging in your own classes. The framework's code then calls your code at these points.

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Please use the close button on a question if you think it's a duplicate and do not post two exactly same answers. –  vba4all Feb 25 at 8:27

protected by Mohammad Adil Nov 25 '13 at 12:41

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