Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please, consider the following example:

template.php:

<?php

echo $vars['arr'];

echo " -------- ";

echo $vars['obj'];

?>

test.php:

<?php
$file = "template.php";
$vars = array( 'arr' => array(), 'obj' => new StdClass() );  

var_dump( json_encode($vars)  );  

function loadFile($file, $vars)
{
    try 
    {
        if (is_array($vars) && !empty($vars)) {
            extract($vars);
        }

        ob_start();
        include $file;
        return ob_get_clean();
    } 
    catch (Exception $e) 
    {
        return false;
    }
}

loadFile($file, $vars);

?>

This code will output:

string(19) "{"arr":[],"obj":{}}"
PHP Catchable fatal error:  Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in template.php

The problem here is, in the template.php I am considering $vars to be an array() however 1 of the elements is an Object as you can see from the json output.

Adding a simple checking in the template to verify if the ekement is an array or not would solve the problem, however I would need to this to multiple elements, elements, so, not very good =) so, I trying to find a way to prevent the error in the moment of binding the template and $vars.

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
“in case of parsing failures” Parsing failures? You can't catch parsing failures. –  Waleed Khan Feb 14 '13 at 13:55
1  
@WaleedKhan, technically you can handle the output by setting register_shutdown_function. –  Jefffrey Feb 14 '13 at 13:56
2  
a Catchable fatal error can't be caught with a try/catch block, only by set_error_handler. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/2468487/… –  cbuckley Feb 14 '13 at 13:56
    
You could possibly try to implement the ArrayAccess-Class into your object. That might circumvent your problem. –  Louis Huppenbauer Feb 14 '13 at 13:56
add comment

4 Answers

simply turn error_reporting off while parsing:

$old_level = error_reporting(0); // no errors, preserve old error reporting level
ob_start();
include $file;
$content = ob_get_clean();
error_reporting($old_level); // reset error reporting level
return $content;

Note: This will only hide errors that aren't very critical.

In order to catch a Catchable Fatal Error, see this question: How can I catch a "catchable fatal error" on PHP type hinting?

You need to register an error handler using set_error_handler:

function handleError($errno, $errstr, $errfile, $errline) {
  // handle error

  // return true, so the normal php handler doesn't get called
  return true;
}
set_error_handler('handleError');

If you want to integrate you handler cleanly into other code which also sets error_handlers, you might consider restoring the error handler afterwards using restore_error_handler

share|improve this answer
add comment

You might try checking to see if the values are an object first, and then using the PHP function to convert to an array.

Note, this section of your code:

if (is_array($vars) && !empty($vars)) {
    extract($vars);
}

After that, if I'm reading your code correctly, you have a variable possibly called $vars that could be an object. So, you could do this:

if (is_object($vars)) {
    $vars = get_object_vars($vars);
}

That should convert it to what you need. Of course, you may need to experiment a bit to make sure it fits your scenario. Thanks!

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use __toString() method in your class to avoid the error. You can set the __toString() method with any value you need, maybe return an array. http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.magic.php#object.tostring

Another option, is use array_walk :

function checkObj(&$vars){ 
if (is_object($vars)) {
    $vars = get_object_vars($vars);
}
} 
array_walk($vars, "checkObj"); 
share|improve this answer
add comment

Since you are using ob_start(), you can pass it a call-back that will check for any errors. It should even work with fatal errors. Inside your call-back use something like "error_get_last" to check for any error and just return false if it's not null, like so:

WARNING: I've not tested this code, but I use something similar myself.

<?php
    $file = "template.php";
    $vars = array( 'arr' => array(), 'obj' => new StdClass() );

    var_dump( json_encode($vars)  );

    function loadFile($file, $vars)
    {
        try
        {
            if (is_array($vars) && !empty($vars)) {
                extract($vars);
            }

            ob_start('errorHandler');
            include $file;
            return ob_get_clean();
        }
        catch (Exception $e)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    function errorHandler($pBuffer)
    {
        $lastError = error_get_last();
        // Uh-oh, an error has occurred.
        if ($lastError !== NULL)
        {
            return FALSE;
        }
        // No problems.
        return $pBuffer;
    }

    loadFile($file, $vars);

?>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.