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The mapping below works, but I was wondering if it can be done with less configuration. I've tried playing around with ForAllMembers and ForSourceMember but I haven't found anything that works so far.

Classes

public class User
{
    [Key]
    public int ID { get; set; }

    public string LoginName { get; set; }

    public int Group { get; set; }

    ...
}

public class UserForAuthorisation
{
    public string LoginName { get; set; }

    public int Group { get; set; }
}

public class Session
{
    [Key]
    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public Guid ID { get; set; }

    public virtual User User { get; set; }

    ...
}

Configuration

Mapper.CreateMap<Session, UserForAuthorisation>()
    .ForMember(u => u.LoginName, m => m.MapFrom(s => s.User.LoginName))
    .ForMember(u => u.Group, m => m.MapFrom(s => s.User.Group));

Query

UserForAuthorisation user = this.DbContext.Sessions
    .Where(item =>
        item.ID == SessionID
        )
    .Project().To<UserForAuthorisation>()
    .Single();

Edit This works for the reverse.

Mapper.CreateMap<UserForAuthorisation, User>();

Mapper.CreateMap<UserForAuthorisation, Session>()
    .ForMember(s => s.User, m => m.MapFrom(u => u));

var source = new UserForAuthorisation()
{
    Group = 5,
    LoginName = "foo"
};
var destination = Mapper.Map<Session>(source);

Unfortunately, Reverse() isn't the easy solution, mapping doesn't work.

Mapper.CreateMap<UserForAuthorisation, User>().ReverseMap();

Mapper.CreateMap<UserForAuthorisation, Session>()
    .ForMember(s => s.User, m => m.MapFrom(u => u)).ReverseMap();

var source = new Session()
{
    User = new User()
    {
        Group = 5,
        LoginName = "foo"
    }
};
var destination = Mapper.Map<UserForAuthorisation>(source);
share|improve this question
    
Because you're flattening, and want to map both ways, I don't think you can get much simpler. I tend to just use profiles and hide the configuration away. –  Mightymuke Feb 14 '13 at 21:19
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can see only one option to do less configurations. You can use benefit of flattering by renaming properties of UserForAuthorisation class to:

public class UserForAuthorisation
{
    public string UserLoginName { get; set; }
    public int UserGroup { get; set; }
}

In this case properties of nested User object will be mapped without any additional configuration:

Mapper.CreateMap<Session, UserForAuthorisation>();
share|improve this answer
1  
Less configuration indeed, unfortunately that means having code like user.UserLoginName. +1 but I'll wait to see if there's a better answer. –  Stijn Feb 14 '13 at 15:52
    
@Stijn thanks for accepting, and yes user.UserLoginName is not best code, but that's how flattering works. Actually it's not very complex to specify several ForMember mappings, 2-3 minutes of time I think. So I'd spend that time to have user.LoginName instead :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Feb 15 '13 at 9:40
1  
Agree, it's not much work, but I figured asking wouldn't hurt :) The official documentation isn't very comprehensive. –  Stijn Feb 15 '13 at 9:52
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