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I have been using awk to sum up multiple files, this is used to sum up the summary of server log parsing values, it really does speed up the final overall count but I have hit a minor problem and the typical examples I have hit on the web have not helped.

Here is the example:

cat file1
aa 1
bb 2
cc 3
ee 4

cat file2
aa 1
bb 2
cc 3
dd 4

cat file3
aa 1
bb 2
cc 3
ff 4

And the script:

cat test.sh 
#!/bin/bash

files="file1 file2 file3"

i=0;
oldname="";
for names in $(echo $files); do
        ((i++));
        if [ $i == 1 ]; then
                oldname=$names
                #echo "-- $i $names"
                shift;
        else
               oldname1=$names.$$
        awk  'NR==FNR { _[$1]=$2 } NR!=FNR { if(_[$1] != "") nn=0; nn=($2+_[$1]); print $1" "nn }' $names $oldname> $oldname1
        if [ $i -gt 2 ]; then
            rm $oldname;
        fi
                oldname=$oldname1

    fi
done
echo "------------------------------ $i"
cat $oldname

When I run this, the identical columns are added up but those that appear only in one of the files does not

./test.sh 
------------------------------ 3
aa 3
bb 6
cc 9
ee 4

ff dd does not appear in the list, from what I have seen its within the NR==FR

I have come across this:

http://dbaspot.com/shell/246751-awk-comparing-two-files-problem.html

you want all the lines in file1 that are not in file2,
awk 'NR == FNR { a[$0]; next } !($0 in a)' file2 file1

If you want only uniq lines in file1 that are not in file2,
awk 'NR == FNR { a[$0]; next } !($0 in a) { print; a[$0] }'
file2
file1

but this only complicates current issue further when attempted since lots of other fields get duplicated

After posting question - updates to the content ... and tests....

I wanted to stick with awk since it does appear to be a much shorter way of achieving result there is a problem still..

awk '{a[$1]+=$2}END{for (k in a) print k,a[k]}'  file1 file2 file3
aa 3
bb 6
cc 9
ee 4
ff 4
gg 4
RESULT_SET_4 0
RESULT_SET_3 0
RESULT_SET_2 0
RESULT_SET_1 0
$ cat file1 
RESULT_SET_1
aa 1
RESULT_SET_2
bb 2
RESULT_SET_3
cc 3
RESULT_SET_4
ff 4
$ cat file2
RESULT_SET_1
aa 1
RESULT_SET_2
bb 2
RESULT_SET_3
cc 3
RESULT_SET_4
ee 4

The file content is not left as it was originally i.e. the results are not under the headings, my original method did keep it all intact

Updated expected output - headings in correct context

cat file1 
RESULT_SET_1
aa 1
RESULT_SET_2
bb 2
RESULT_SET_3
cc 3
RESULT_SET_4
ff 4



cat file2 
RESULT_SET_1
aa 1
RESULT_SET_2
bb 2
RESULT_SET_3
cc 3
RESULT_SET_4
ee 4


cat file3
RESULT_SET_1
aa 1
RESULT_SET_2
bb 2
RESULT_SET_3
cc 3
RESULT_SET_4
gg 4
test.sh awk line to produce above is :

awk -v i=$i 'NR==FNR { _[$1]=$2 } NR!=FNR { if (_[$1] != "") { if  ($2 ~ /[0-9]/)   { nn=($2+_[$1]); print $1" "nn; } else { print;} }else { print; } }' $names $oldname> $oldname1

./test.sh 
------------------------------ 3
RESULT_SET_1
aa 3
RESULT_SET_2
bb 6
RESULT_SET_3
cc 9
RESULT_SET_4
ff 4

works but destroys required formatting

  awk '($2 != "")  {a[$1]+=$2};  ($2 == "") {  a[$1]=$2 } END {for (k in a) print k,a[k]} '  file1 file2 file3
    aa 3
    bb 6
    cc 9
    ee 4
    ff 4
    gg 4
    RESULT_SET_4 
    RESULT_SET_3 
    RESULT_SET_2 
    RESULT_SET_1 
share|improve this question
    
What are "the headings"? I don't see anything like that in the example data you first posted. This makes it a different question. If you change the question this significantly AFTER it has been answered, you probably shouldn't expect folks to answer it a second time. –  ghoti Feb 14 '13 at 14:43
    
yep sorry :) my bad, the reports do have headings then field values should i repost a new question? –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 14:49
1  
What is the expected output now? –  iiSeymour Feb 14 '13 at 14:59
    
updated the question with expected output, basically each servers output will have headings for each segment followed by field and its values... kind of like the last updated content of file1 file2 and the expected result is produced by original script - with the obvious issue still there - the process below does work but the order is lost and headings appear in incorrect format –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 15:34
    
I think this will be very useful for others so long as they think about logs differently in the first instance.. so I have put it as a project here github.com/vahidhedayati/summarise-server-logs –  vahid Feb 17 '13 at 16:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$ awk '{a[$1]+=$2}END{for (k in a) print k,a[k]}' file1 file2 file3 | sort
aa 3
bb 6
cc 9
dd 4
ee 4
ff 4

Edit:

It's a bit of a hack but it does the job:

$ awk 'FNR==NR&&!/RESULT/{a[$1]=$2;next}($1 in a){a[$1]+=$2}END{for (k in a) print k,a[k]}' file1 file2 file3 | sort | awk '$1="RESULTS_SET_"NR"\n"$1'
RESULTS_SET_1
aa 3
RESULTS_SET_2
bb 6
RESULTS_SET_3
cc 9
RESULTS_SET_4
ff 4
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 That's almost exactly how I'd do it. (I might have chosen different single-letter variable and array names. ;] ) –  ghoti Feb 14 '13 at 14:20
1  
thank you so much Sudo_O –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 14:22
    
there is still an issue in the case of rows that are not supposed to be added, I have updated the original post –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 14:40
    
@vahid see edit. –  iiSeymour Feb 14 '13 at 15:40
    
Thanks Sudo, this works fine so long as the content within each heading is 1 field, if there are multiple fields values under a heading it will only show the first :( –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 15:50

You can do this in awk, as sudo_O suggested, but you can also do it in pure bash.

#!/bin/bash

# We'll use an associative array, where the indexes are strings.
declare -A a

# Our list of files, in an array (not associative)
files=(file1 file2 file3)

# Walk through array of files...
for file in "${files[@]}"; do
  # And for each file, increment the array index with the value.
  while read index value; do
    ((a[$index]+=$value))
  done < "$file"
done 

# Walk through array. ${!...} returns a list of indexes.
for i in ${!a[@]}; do
  echo "$i ${a[$i]}"
done

And the result:

$ ./doit
dd 4
aa 3
ee 4
bb 6
ff 4
cc 9

And if you want the output sorted ... you can pipe it through sort. :)

share|improve this answer
    
But awk will be faster. –  Graham Feb 14 '13 at 14:39
    
Yes, of course. The checkmark is in the right place. I included this because the question is also tagged bash, and bash scripting is fun. –  ghoti Feb 14 '13 at 14:41

Here's one way using GNU awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk File1 File2 File3

Contents of script.awk:

sub(/RESULT_SET_/,"") {

    i = $1
    next
}

{
    a[i][$1]+=$2
}

END {
    for (j=1;j<=length(a);j++) {

        print "RESULT_SET_" j

        for (k in a[j]) {
            print k, a[j][k]
        }
    }
}

Results:

RESULT_SET_1
aa 3
RESULT_SET_2
bb 6
RESULT_SET_3
cc 9
RESULT_SET_4
ee 4
ff 4
gg 4

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk 'sub(/RESULT_SET_/,"") { i = $1; next } { a[i][$1]+=$2 } END { for (j=1;j<=length(a);j++) { print "RESULT_SET_" j; for (k in a[j]) print k, a[j][k] } }' File1 File2 File3
share|improve this answer
    
is this running on Linux ? awk 'sub(/RESULT_SET_/,"") { i = $1; next } { a[i][$1]+=$2 } END { for (j=1;j<=length(a);j++) { print "RESULT_SET_" j; for (k in a[j]) print k, a[j][k] } }' file1 file2 file3 awk: line 1: syntax error at or near [ awk: line 1: illegal reference to array a awk: line 1: syntax error at or near [ –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 16:00
    
./script.awk file1 file2 ./script.awk: line 1: syntax error near unexpected token /RESULT_SET_/,""' ./script.awk: line 1: sub(/RESULT_SET_/,"") {' –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 16:00
    
ok thanks this does work using gawk as you said GNU Awk :) –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 16:29
    
it has to be gawk 4 + initial gawk 3.XX was not working - cool –  vahid Feb 14 '13 at 16:40
    
@vahid: Yes, I would prefer to see a solution to your problem using GNU awk (and I'm assuming you've got the latest version of it installed). The solution itself can be made a lot simpler using a multidimensional array - and it would be more maintainable too. If you're happy with it, don't forget to accept it. If not, please let me know. Cheers. –  Steve Feb 14 '13 at 23:45

fixed using this Basically it goes through each file, if the entry exists on the other side, it will add the entry to approximate line number with a 0 value so that it can sum up the content - been testing this on my current output and seems to be working real well

#!/bin/bash

 files="file1 file2 file3 file4 file5 file6 file7 file8"
RAND="$$"
i=0;
oldname="";
for names in $(echo $files); do
        ((i++));
        if [ $i == 1 ]; then
                oldname=$names
                shift;
        else
               oldname1=$names.$RAND
        for entries in $(awk -v i=$i 'NR==FNR { _[$1]=$2 } NR!=FNR { if (_[$1] == "") { if  ($2 ~ /[0-9]/)   { nn=0; nn=(_[$1]+=$2);  print FNR"-"$1"%0"} else { } } else { } }' $oldname $names); do
                line=$(echo ${entries%%-*})
                content=$(echo ${entries#*-})
                content=$(echo $content|tr "%" " ")

edit=$(ed -s $oldname  << EOF
$line
a
$content
.
w
q
EOF 
)

$edit  >/dev/null 2>&1

done

                awk -v i=$i 'NR==FNR { _[$1]=$2 } NR!=FNR { if (_[$1] != "") { if  ($2 ~ /[0-9]/)   { nn=0; nn=($2+_[$1]); print $1" "nn; } else { print $1;} }else { print; } }' $names $oldname> $oldname1
        oldname=$oldname1
    fi
done

cat $oldname
#rm file?.*
share|improve this answer

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