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I have a simple interface ElementContainer (which is also an element) which holds a list with Elements in it:

interface IElementContainer : IElement 
{
    List<Element> Elements { get; }
}

Now I have a class implementing this interface:

class ConcreteContainer : IElementContainer
{
    List<IElement> Elements { get; private set; }
}

But I don't want the class to be a container for all Elements but only for a subset of them, say SpecificElement, however this is not possible (ofcourse):

class SpecificElementContainer : IElementContainer
{
    List<SpecificElement> Elements { get; private set; }
}

Therefore I thought of something like:

class SpecificElementContainer : IElementContainer
{
    List<IElement> Elements { get; private set; }
    List<SpecificElement> SpecificElements
    {
       get 
       {
          return return Elements.FindAll(el => el is T).Select<IElement, T>(el => (T)el).ToList<T>();
       }
 }

But this way I can not do something like: SpecificContainer.SpecificElements.Add(...) since it not added to the Elements. And besides that... it smells fishy to do it like this.

Any clues how to restructure this in a sane way?

Edit after Jon Skeet's answer

Reading Jons comment my problem is actually a little more complicated than I showed above but I forgot some very important information.

When I have a class which implements the above interface and the elements list is filled like this:

Elements = { ConcreteElementA, ConcreteElementA, ConcreteElementC, ConcreteElementB }

What I would like is that I could do this ConcreteContainer.ConcreteElementCs.Add(new ConcreteElementC()) which would result in:

Elements = { ConcreteElementA, ConcreteElementA, ConcreteElementC, ConcreteElementB, ConcreteElementC }

Additional edit

After some confusion I want to rephrase my question as follows: I have a collection List<Element> OriginalCollection. I want to create a subset collection with elements which implement Element, ConcreteElement, List<ConcreteElement> Subset and add to that in such a way that OriginalCollection is also modified.

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Advice - use same code convention, as used everywhere in .NET, i.e. interfaces named with prefix I: IElement –  Sergey Berezovskiy Feb 14 '13 at 14:26
    
Thanks, I will remember; My above post is just for illustrative purposes. –  avanwieringen Feb 14 '13 at 14:32
    
@avanwieringen: Yes, but when you're trying to illustrate something, it's still important to be clear... –  Jon Skeet Feb 14 '13 at 14:38
    
You're right, I have changed it. –  avanwieringen Feb 14 '13 at 14:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like your ElementContainer interface should be generic:

interface ElementContainer<T> : Element where T : Element
{
    List<T> Elements { get; }
}

Then:

class SpecificElementContainer : ElementContainer<SpecificElement>
{
    List<SpecificElement> Elements { get; private set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I have updated my question with a more complex problem, which is actually the problem I am meant, but failed to illustrate properly :) –  avanwieringen Feb 14 '13 at 14:33
    
@avanwieringen: You're still not illustrating it clearly, I'm afraid - I don't understand your update. If ConcreteElementCs is always just a copy, then you simply can't add to it (and expect anything useful to happen) - you would need to add to Elements instead. Why would you not just do that? –  Jon Skeet Feb 14 '13 at 14:40
    
Sorry for the confusion and I am thankful for your help. Is there any way to retrieve a subset of a collection, add to that in such a way that the original collection is modified? I am afraid it is not possible and I will have to refactor my code using the solution you provided, which is actually a lot more sane then the thing I am trying to create I think. –  avanwieringen Feb 14 '13 at 14:43
    
@avanwieringen: I think you'd have to write your own collection to support that. It's feasible, but difficult in various ways. –  Jon Skeet Feb 14 '13 at 14:48
    
Yeah, I was afraid of that. Thanks! I will rethink my architecture. –  avanwieringen Feb 14 '13 at 14:50

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