Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I take the difference between adjacent records in mongoDB using javascript? For example, if I have the following three documents in a collection:

{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50ed90a55502684f440001ac"),
    "time" : ISODate("2013-02-13T15:45:41.148Z")
}

{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50ed90a55502684f440001ac"),
    "time" : ISODate("2013-02-13T15:45:42.148Z")
}

{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50ed90a55502684f440001ac"),
    "time" : ISODate("2013-02-13T15:45:45.148Z")
}

I want to take the difference in the "time" field between adjacent values to get:

{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50ed90a55502684f440001ac"),
    "time" : ISODate("2013-02-13T15:45:41.148Z"),
    "time_difference" : null
}

{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50ed90a55502684f440001ac"),
    "time" : ISODate("2013-02-13T15:45:42.148Z"),
    "time_difference" : 1
}

{
    "_id" : ObjectId("50ed90a55502684f440001ac"),
    "time" : ISODate("2013-02-13T15:45:45.148Z"),
    "time_difference" : 3
}

Any ideas on how to do this efficiently in javascript/mongoDB? Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The one thing you will want to make sure of here is that you have a sort on the query you wish to use to garnish your records. If no sort is used it will actually use find order, which is not $natural order.

Find order can differ between queries so if you run the query twice within the period of 2 minutes you might find that they don't return the same order. It does seem however that your query would be logically sorted on tiem_difference.

It should also by noted that this is not possible through normal querying. I also do not see an easy way doing this through the aggregation framework.

So already it seems the next plausible method is either using multiple queries or client side processing. Client side processing is probably the better here using a function like the one defined by @Marlon above.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I ended up creating a cursor that was sorted on time, then using a forEach loop on the cursor to loop through the data and using the .update and $set commands to add a "time_difference" value to the existing database. My approach won't work in real time, which would have been nice, but wasn't strictly necessary. –  user1910316 Feb 15 '13 at 16:26
    
@user1910316 yea always doing the calculation before hand and then just querying on it or piping it out in your code will always 100x faster –  Sammaye Feb 15 '13 at 19:31

One thing, I want to clear you. Unlike MYSQL, MongoDB is not give gurantee to the position. I mean, MongoDB will give you different sort at different time. So compare adjacent document may give different result, on every reading.

If you are fine with that and you want to compare then try with MongoDB's MapReduce http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/applications/map-reduce/

share|improve this answer
    
What? What do you mean by the MySQL and MongoDB sort thing? It makes no sense –  Sammaye Feb 14 '13 at 14:39
    
Thanks lilarudeens. I could preserve order by not adding new records and creating a cursor like: var cursor = db.collection.sort({time:1}); Now I need to take the difference between adjacent values in a cursor instead of a collection, which I'm not sure how to do efficiently either. I'm generally aware of the map-reduce framework, but I'm not clear on how I would generate a key for documents 1 and 2, then another key for documents 2, 3, etc. when the map function would perform the same operation on all documents. –  user1910316 Feb 14 '13 at 14:49
    
@user1910316 You cannot really (easily) due to the way MR filters and iterates results. This also would not work in realtime to your own application, where I anticipate this to happen. MR is designed to be run paralell to your application not inline to it. –  Sammaye Feb 14 '13 at 15:44

Assuming those 3 objects are coming through in an array, you could do something like the below:

var prevTime;
var currentTime;

for(var i = 0; i < records.length; i++)
{
    currentTime = new Date(records[i].time).getTime();
    records[i].time_difference = currentTime - prevTime;
    prevTime = currentTime;
}

Of course you'll need to swap bits out to make it use the records from mongo.

If you need to do any more complex date calculations, I highly suggest checking out datejs (which you can get a node wrapper for if you want).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.