Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In our application (with PostgreSQL under the hood (currently 9.1, moving for 9.2) we INSERT (or UPDATE) and UPDATE again a particular row while processing some request. So it looks like:

BEGIN
INSERT(pg), UPDATE(java)
XOR
UPDATE(pg), UPDATE(java)
COMMIT

(procession is divided between postgres and java, postgres gets and inserts/updates what it can (other columns NULL), returns the control to the java app, and it updates the remaining columns).

Sadly, we discovered a design flaw in the application that can result inconsistent data after the commit in the particular row (in extremely rare conditions, there was exactly one occurance for years). To be more specific, if columnA = 'someConstant', columnB CANNOT BE NULL after the COMMIT (but it can be after the first insert/update and before the second update!).

While re-designing the application, we must provide some short-period workaround for preventing this to happen.

I'm currently playing with so-called CONSTRAINT TRIGGERs. They can be DEFERRED just before the COMMIT and they can do arbitrary checking and RAISE EXCEPTION (this is good because the transaction will be rolled back normally). The problem is that I'm having (INSERT,UPDATE) or (UPDATE,UPDATE) statements. As I said, the mentioned inconsistent columns are valid in the middle, but at the end of the transaction. So this is the trick: the trigger should only fire for the second statement. I'm digging the docs, found FOR EACH ROW and FOR EACH STATEMENT. This doesn't help, because both of them will fire twice, but I must fire on the second UPDATE statement only.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

A deferred constraint trigger on update can solve your problem except that it should not check for NEW.column is NULL, because NEW.column will be the value at the time of the update, not the time of the commit, even if the trigger fires at the time of the commit.

What you could do is a row-level deferred constraint trigger like this (assuming that table has a primary key named pk) to test the value that is current at the end of the transaction:

DECLARE
 v column_type; -- to fetch the value at the end of the transaction
BEGIN
 SELECT column INTO v FROM table WHERE pk=NEW.pk;
 IF FOUND AND v IS NULL THEN
   RAISE ERROR 'Null not allowed in column';
 END IF
 RETURN new;
END;

If the table has no primary key, then some different way should be found to get at the latest column value (not the ctid because it wouldn't work in the multiple updates scenario).

share|improve this answer

Thanks Daniel. I'm currently testing this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION noFalseData() RETURNS trigger LANGUAGE plpgsql AS $$
DECLARE
 v text;
BEGIN
 SELECT column INTO v FROM active.table WHERE othercolumn = 'SOME_CONSTANT' AND pk=NEW.pk;
 IF FOUND AND v IS NULL THEN
   RAISE EXCEPTION 'Null not allowed in column';
 END IF;
 RETURN NULL;
END;
$$;

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER watchActCampUpd AFTER UPDATE
ON active.table DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
FOR EACH ROW
EXECUTE PROCEDURE noFalseData();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.