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I notice that looks_like_number doesn't simply return true/false as I'd assumed, but actually returns a byte indicating the type of number the perl internals say is stored in the scalar. For example:

perl  -e'use Scalar::Util qw/looks_like_number/; for (qw/ 1 3 10 34.23 545435.234 2343.0 234 -1423 1sddf -865178652134876152348761253487613254 sdf 24363456345636534563567253765734655  8764325hjkh435 iuh340874 &*^*& 786521948761324876132497821347816.23452345 -8762135487126387432.12435154243 0 nan inf/) { print $_, ": ", looks_like_number($_), "\n" } '
1: 1
3: 1
10: 1
34.23: 5
545435.234: 5
2343.0: 5
234: 1
-1423: 9
1sddf: 0
-865178652134876152348761253487613254: 10
sdf: 0
24363456345636534563567253765734655: 2
8764325hjkh435: 0
iuh340874: 0
&*^*&: 0
786521948761324876132497821347816.23452345: 6
-8762135487126387432.12435154243: 14
0: 1
nan: 36
inf: 20

It's not actually documented in Scalar::Util that I can find, just a mention of it returning perlapi's looks_like_number value, which also isn't in the documentation. At a glance, it appears to be:

  • & 1 = numeric
  • & 2 = 64 bit
  • & 4 = floating point
  • & 8 = negative
  • & 16 = infinity
  • & 32 = not a number

Are these masks portable and safe to use in code?

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For what it's worth looks_like_number() appears to return the same values for your sample inputs on all stable perls since 5.8, at least on Linux 32-bit. Of course, the prudent answer to your question is still "no." –  pilcrow Feb 14 '13 at 16:26
    
As of Scalar::Util 1.39, this has been changed, and looks_like_number always returns PL_yes or PL_no (i.e. !!1 or !!0). –  tobyink Oct 2 '14 at 6:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, if they are not documented, they are subject to change. And "numeric" and "64 bit" aren't really adequate descriptions of those flags. What they do do doesn't seem particularly useful to know in Perl code.

What problem are you trying to solve?

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Yeah, real or big is probably better, from my vague recollection of C. I'm trying to validate input as an int, and probably doing premature optimization instead of just running it against /^\d+$/ –  Oesor Feb 14 '13 at 15:40
    
forums.xkcd.com/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=100204#p3270122 - maybe you mean [0-9]+ (or use the /a modifier in 5.14+) –  ysth Feb 14 '13 at 15:49
    
And that's why I was looking at a non-re method in the first place :P. –  Oesor Feb 14 '13 at 16:07

Don't rely on undocumented behaviour, the return value is bound to Perl's internals, it can (and likely will) change in the future; it may even be different depending on which platform/architecture your script is running on!

If you want to test for NaN, infinity or negative zero, see this question.

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