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Handles have proper semantics other than pointers. So for me an example like this (extracted from the Rule of Zero):

class module {
public:
    explicit module(std::wstring const& name)
    : handle { ::LoadLibrary(name.c_str()), &::FreeLibrary } {}

    // other module related functions go here

private:
    using module_handle = std::unique_ptr<void, decltype(&::FreeLibrary)>;

    module_handle handle;
};

using unique_ptr as an 'ownership-in-a-package' for handles is a bad example. First, it makes use of internal knowledge that the handle is a pointer type, and use this to make a unique_ptr to the basic type the "opaque" handle type builds upon.

Handles can be any type, they may be a pointer, they may be an index or who knows. Most importantly, what you have at hand (from most C API's for example) is a handle and its resource releasing function.

Is there a proper 'ownership-in-a-package' that works in handle semantics? I mean, already publicly available for one to use?

For me, unique_ptr et. al. doesn't work, I must make unnecessary assumptions about what the handle type is, when what I want is just to get an 'ownership-in-a-package' through the opaque handle type and its releasing function, solely.

It doesn't make sense for one to peer inside the handle type to make constructions upon this information. It's a handle, it should not matter.

I'll quote here the feelings of another SO user in another question's answer:

Create a specific "smart pointer" class, won't take long. Don't abuse library classes. Handle semantics is quite different from that of a C++ pointer; for one thing, dereferencing a HANDLE makes no sense.

One more reason to use a custom smart handle class - NULL does not always mean an empty handle. Sometimes it's INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE, which is not the same.

Disclaimer:

This question reformulates and builds upon this one:

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I disagree with your premise. unique_ptr is maybe a slight misnomer – it handles resources. A HANDLE also handles resources. This is a perfect match. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 14 '13 at 15:27
    
I don't base my premises solely on the type name... –  pepper_chico Feb 14 '13 at 15:29
    
What is your problem, exactly? You don't like the name unique_ptr? –  Etienne de Martel Feb 14 '13 at 15:32
5  
@EtiennedeMartel: To use unique_ptr for a non-pointer handle, you need to a special deleter which defines a nested pointer type, and that pointer type can't simply be, say, int, since int doesn't conform to the NullablePointer requirements that unique_ptr wants. However, you can write a simple wrapper that adapts anything to those nullable pointer requirements. If you fancy, you can also add a unary operator* that forwards to *value, and an operator-> so you can actually use *up and up->foo(). –  Xeo Feb 14 '13 at 15:34
5  
@Xeo: If you're going to go through the trouble of writing that wrapper... why not just write a proper RAII object that can hold any value and call a given function/functor on that type when it is destroyed? It's a hell of a lot less obtuse than using unique_ptr for non-pointer things. Seriously, writing copy/move constructors for one object is hardly an onerous burden. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 15 '13 at 3:23
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4 Answers 4

The type unique_ptr is less general than the phrase "handle", yes. But why shouldn't it be? Just one of your "handle" examples (say, the one that is an integer index), is precisely as general as unique_ptr. You can't compare one specific kind of handle with "all handles ever".

If you want a single, concrete C++ type (or type template) that is a handle without actually defining any specific handling semantics then... I can't help you. I don't think anyone tractibly could.

share|improve this answer
    
It's less general, and hence, should be used where it fits. When one starts looking up what HANDLE (supposed to be opaque, one of the main characteristics of handles) is built upon, and use that information in the less general tool, for me, this is bad smell. Of course, one can assert HANDLE is void * for my case, what about other handle based libraries, are you going to assume that assertion aways? And this assumption is not part of handle semantics, HANDLE is opaque. –  pepper_chico Feb 14 '13 at 15:52
    
@chico: "other handle based libraries" have different handle types. unique_ptr is one handle type. What actual problem are you encountering in your coding? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 14 '13 at 16:09
2  
unique_ptr is one handle type? I dunno what you mean by that. HANDLE is a handle type. My actual problem is ignoring it's opaque to make use of unique_ptr to manage the lifetime of the resource it refers to. I consider this bad practice, and I'm asking for a known 'ownership-in-a-package' alternative that does it right. By right I mean, not violation encapsulation like that. Handle types are opaque and a good tool would handle handles, at last integral and pointer based, the same syntactical way. –  pepper_chico Feb 14 '13 at 17:37
    
@chico: You keep saying that handle types must be opaque but I don't see any reason for it. unique_ptr just does fine for a handle with pointer semantics. Sure, it doesn't have non-pointer semantics. It's one kind of handle. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 14 '13 at 17:42
1  
It doesn't matter whether one doesn't see a reason for handles to be assumed as opaque, what matters is that they're generally assumed as such. You may build your handle type as a void * internally and assert upfront for your customers it'll aways be like that. Your clients are than safe to use unique_ptr<void> with it (look that unique_ptr<void> doesn't really make sense, you can infer nothing from a handle type, it's not a pointer to untyped). But this is the case for your special handle. This process doesn't fit for handles, generally speaking. –  pepper_chico Feb 14 '13 at 17:50
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This is a toy example of "type disguising" I was having fun, that also has something to do with the discussion. I'll leave it here for reference (I'm not responsible for any harm caused by it!).

#ifndef _DISGUISE_HPP_
#define _DISGUISE_HPP_

#include <cassert>
#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

namespace disguise
{
    template<typename T>
    struct default_release { void operator()(const T &) const { std::cout << "I'M DUMB" << std::endl; } };

    template<typename T>
    struct default_release<T *> { void operator()(T *p) const { std::cout << "I'M SMART" << std::endl; delete p; } };

    template<typename R>
    struct default_release<R ()> { void operator()(R (*f)()) const { std::cout << "I'M A SCOPE-EXIT FUNCTION" << std::endl; f(); } };

    template<typename R>
    struct default_release<R (*)()> { void operator()(R (*f)()) const { std::cout << "I'M A SCOPE-EXIT FUNCTION POINTER" << std::endl; f(); } };

    template<typename F, F> struct releaser;

    //template<typename R, typename P, R F(P)> struct releaser_impl_f { void operator()(P v) const { F(v); } };
    template<typename R, typename P, R (*F)(P)> struct releaser_impl_p { void operator()(P v) const { F(v); } };

    //template<typename R, typename P, R F(P)> struct releaser<R (P), F> : releaser_impl_f<R, P, F> {};
    template<typename R, typename P, R (*F)(P)> struct releaser<R (*)(P), F> : releaser_impl_p<R, P, F> {};

    #define RELEASER(f) disguise::releaser<decltype(f), (f)>

    template<typename T, typename F>
    class unique_impl
    {
        T v;
        F f;
        bool empty = true;

    public:

        unique_impl() {}
        unique_impl(const unique_impl &) = delete;
        unique_impl &operator=(const unique_impl &) = delete;

        unique_impl &operator=(unique_impl &&other)
        {
            assert(!other.empty);
            if(!empty) f(v);
            v = std::move(other.v);
            f = std::move(other.f);
            empty = false;
            other.empty = true;
            return *this;
        }

        unique_impl(unique_impl &&other) { assert(!other.empty); *this = std::move(other); }

        unique_impl(const T &v_, const F &f_ = F()) : v(v_), f(f_), empty(false) {}
        unique_impl(T &&v_, const F &f_ = F()) : v(std::move(v_)), f(f_), empty(false) {}
        unique_impl &operator=(const T &v_) { if(!empty) f(v); v = v_; empty = false; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator=(T &&v_) { if(!empty) f(v); v = std::move(v_); empty = false; return *this; }

        ~unique_impl() { if(!empty) f(v); }

        operator T () const { assert(!empty); return v; }
        unique_impl &operator+=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v += v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator-=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v -= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator*=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v *= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator/=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v /= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator%=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v %= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator|=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v |= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator&=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v &= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator^=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v ^= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator>>=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v >>= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator<<=(const T& v_) { assert(!empty); v <<= v_; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator++() { assert(!empty); ++v; return *this; }
        unique_impl &operator--() { assert(!empty); --v; return *this; }
        T operator++(int) { assert(!empty); return v++; }
        T operator--(int) { assert(!empty); return v--; }
        const T &operator->() const { assert(!empty); return v; }
        T &operator->() { assert(!empty); return v; }
        const T *operator&() const { assert(!empty); return &v; }
        T *operator&() { assert(!empty); return &v; }
    };

    template<typename T, typename F = default_release<T>>
    struct unique : unique_impl<T, F>
    {
        unique() {}
        unique(unique &&) = default;
        unique &operator=(unique &&) = default;
        unique(const unique &) = delete;
        unique &operator=(const unique &) = delete;

        unique(const T &v_, const F &f_ = F()) : unique_impl<T, F>(v_, f_) {}
        unique(T &&v_, const F &f_ = F()) : unique_impl<T, F>(std::move(v_), f_) {}
    };

    template<typename R, typename F>
    struct unique<R (), F> : unique_impl<R (*)(), F>
    {
        typedef R (*T)();

        unique() {}
        unique(unique &&) = default;
        unique &operator=(unique &&) = default;
        unique(const unique &) = delete;
        unique &operator=(const unique &) = delete;

        unique(const T &v_, const F &f_ = F()) : unique_impl<T, F>(v_, f_) {}
        unique(T &&v_, const F &f_ = F()) : unique_impl<T, F>(std::move(v_), f_) {}
    };
}

#endif // _DISGUISE_HPP_

Test:

#include <disguise.hpp>

using namespace disguise;

void disguised_address(const int *i)
{
    std::cout << *i << std::endl;
}

typedef void *handle;
handle create_handle(){ std::cout << "creating a handle" << std::endl; return static_cast<handle>(new int); };
void release_handle(handle h){ std::cout << "releasing a handle" << std::endl; delete static_cast<int *>(h); };
void manipulate_handle(handle h) { std::cout << "manipulating handle" << std::endl; }

int main()
{
    unique<void()> f = { []{ std::cout << "Hi" << std::endl; } };
    f = { []{ std::cout << "Bye" << std::endl; } };

    {
        int i;

        i = 10;
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
        i++;
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
        if(i > 0)
            std::cout << "i > 0" << std::endl;
        int j = i;
        j += i;
        std::cout << "j == " << j << std::endl;
        disguised_address(&i);
    }

    {
        unique<int> i;

        i = 10;
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
        i++;
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
        if(i > 0)
            std::cout << "i > 0" << std::endl;
        int j = i;
        j += i;
        std::cout << "j == " << j << std::endl;
        disguised_address(&i);
    }

    struct X{ int x = 10; void hello() const { std::cout << "hello" << std::endl; } };

    unique<X *> out;

    {
        X *x = new X;
        unique<X *> p = x;
        std::cout << p->x << " == " << x->x << std::endl;
        std::cout << (*p).x << " == " << (*x).x << std::endl;
        p->hello();
        (*p).hello();
        out = std::move(p);
    }

    std::cout << "Any smart destruction?" << std::endl;

    {
        unique<X *> p = std::move(out);
    }

    std::cout << "How about now?" << std::endl;

    {
        using unique_handle = unique<handle, RELEASER(&release_handle)>;

        unique_handle h = create_handle();
        manipulate_handle(h);
    }

    {
        unique<handle, decltype(&release_handle)> h = { create_handle(), release_handle };
        manipulate_handle(h);
    }
}

Output:

I'M A SCOPE-EXIT FUNCTION
Hi
10
11
i > 0
j == 22
11
10
11
i > 0
j == 22
11
I'M DUMB
10 == 10
10 == 10
hello
hello
Any smart destruction?
I'M SMART
How about now?
creating a handle
manipulating handle
releasing a handle
creating a handle
manipulating handle
releasing a handle
I'M A SCOPE-EXIT FUNCTION
Bye

I would have had more fun if .(dot) could be overloaded =)

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Glad I came to know in the ##c++ IRC channel about A Proposal to Add additional RAII Wrappers to the Standard Library. It fulfills all I was asking, even doing the extra "impersonation" thing I talk about at my other answer.

Here's the Rule of Zero example code, fixed:

class module {
public:
    explicit module(std::wstring const& name)
    : handle { ::LoadLibrary(name.c_str()) } {}

    // other module related functions go here

private:
    using module_handle = std::unique_resource<UNIQUE_DELETER(::FreeLibrary)>;

    module_handle handle;
};

I've actually ditched my sketch unique_handle from my code to make use of the reference implementation of the scope_exit proposal.

This is the client side sample code of my previous answer, refactored to make use of it:

std::unique_resource<UNIQUE_DELETER(FreeLibraryA)> grab_foobar_lib()
{
    return { LoadLibraryA("foo/bar") };
}

int main()
{
    // using a short lambda here for the case of a
    // non-trivial deleter with more than one argument 
    auto &&gl_list_handle  = std::make_scoped_resource(glGenLists(1), [](GLuint list){ glDeleteLists(list, 1); });

    glCallList(gl_list_handle); // using "impersonation" of the raw handle in the C API

    typedef void (*func)();
    auto &&the_lib = grab_foobar_lib();
    if(the_lib != NULL)
        func f = (func) GetProcAddress(the_lib, "f"); // more impersonation
}

Let's spread the word so that it, or equivalent, gets added to the standard (hopefully soon) and also stop programmers from using smart pointers for what they are not built for.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why force the client to manually provide cleanup (i.e. the lambda passed to make_scoped_resource) at the usage locations? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 16 '13 at 16:22
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes Isn't it the case for unique_ptr with deleter? And if use default_deleter in handle semantics does it make sense? I guess in most cases you get shorter syntax with that, and you have the std::unique_resource option that won't force that. But still, I wonder about a good solution for this. –  pepper_chico Feb 16 '13 at 16:53
1  
Not if your deleter is default-constructible. The point is that make_scoped_resource, just like unique_ptr's ctor that takes a deleter, should never be used in client code. It should only be used in library functions. Something like make_gl_list, that internally perhaps uses make_scoped_resource, but doesn't force the client to care about it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 16 '13 at 16:55
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes Why force a language user to wrap itself all situations involving handles in legacy API usage? A library function may need to call a legacy API once for some operation, why force wrapping for such trivial situation? It's common usage for people interfacing with C, why not provide good resources to deal with this? Little wrappers, private similar functionality wrapper libraries, code tricks, all this must go! –  pepper_chico Feb 16 '13 at 17:14
    
What. In your code sample the user itself must deal with the legacy API (see the call to glDeleteLists there?). That is what should go away. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 16 '13 at 17:33
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This is a rough sketch of the tool I ask, for the case of unique ownership. There's no need to peer inside the native/legacy handle type, no encapsulation violation, no ugly extra wrapping required. Works for almost all kinds of legacy handles, integral or pointer based.

It provides one extra feature, beyond resource management, which is impersonation of the raw handle, I find it somewhat useful.

#include <utility>
#include <cassert>

template<typename T>
struct default_release
{
    void operator ()(const T &) {  }
};

template<typename Handle, typename Release = default_release<Handle>>
class unique_handle
{
    Handle handle;
    Release release;
    bool empty = true;

public:
    unique_handle(const Handle &handle_, const Release &release_ = Release()):
        handle(handle_),
        release(release_),
        empty(false) {}

    unique_handle &operator=(const unique_handle &) = delete;

    unique_handle(const unique_handle &) = delete;

    unique_handle &operator=(unique_handle &&other)
    {
        assert(!other.empty);
        if(!empty)
            release(handle);
        handle = std::move(other.handle);
        release = std::move(other.release);
        empty = false;
        other.empty = true;
        return *this;
    }

    unique_handle(unique_handle &&other)
    {
        *this = std::move(other);
    }

    operator Handle () const
    {
        assert(!empty);
        return handle;
    }

    ~unique_handle()
    {
        if(!empty)
            release(handle);
    }
};

This is some sample usage:

// Types that model some C API
typedef unsigned GLuint;
typedef int GLsizei;

GLuint glGenLists(GLsizei range);
void glCallList(GLuint list);
void glDeleteLists(GLuint list, GLsizei range);

typedef void* HMODULE;
typedef const char *LPCSTR;
typedef int BOOL;
typedef int (*FARPROC) ();

HMODULE LoadLibraryA(LPCSTR lpFileName);
BOOL FreeLibraryA(HMODULE hModule);

FARPROC GetProcAddress(HMODULE hModule, LPCSTR lpProcName);

// The client code
unique_handle<HMODULE, decltype(&FreeLibraryA)> grab_foobar_lib()
{
    return {LoadLibraryA("foo/bar"), &FreeLibraryA};
}

int main()
{
    // using a short lambda here for the case of a
    // non-trivial deleter with more than one argument 
    unique_handle<GLuint, void (*)(GLuint)> gl_list_handle(glGenLists(1), [](GLuint list){ if(list != 0) glDeleteLists(list, 1); });

    glCallList(gl_list_handle); // using "impersonation" of the raw handle in the C API

    typedef void (*func)();
    auto the_lib = grab_foobar_lib(); // potential move semantics
    if(the_lib != NULL)
        func f = (func) GetProcAddress(the_lib, "f"); // more impersonation
}

EDIT

It's surprising how people follow a similar scenario for such situations. This, for example, contains the same handle impersonation feature:

https://github.com/adobe/chromium/blob/master/base/win/scoped_handle.h

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1  
I'd +1 this, but your class assumes a function pointer (it's the default "Releaser"), rather than using something more flexible. I would rather it have a std::default_release, which calls some function that can be overridden to do the releasing. That way, you don't need to give it a specific value at construction time. Also, seriously stop using display lists. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 15 '13 at 3:30
    
@NicolBolas haha, displays lists was just some remote stuff I recalled from old times of OpenGL, the first example of some non-pointer kind of handle that came to my mind, it was just for sake of argumentation :). Also, I'll take a look at std::default_release, I'm not familiar with it. –  pepper_chico Feb 15 '13 at 3:35
    
There is no std::default_release; I was suggesting that you create such a thing. I used the std::prefix just to analogize it with std::default_delete, which does the usual thing (ie: delete). –  Nicol Bolas Feb 15 '13 at 4:02
    
@NicolBolas, I got it. I've just gone through the process of elaborating something like std::default_delete and realized it doesn't work well with handles. Many handle types may be just #defines of the same real type. So, sadly, no way of using them straight in different default_release specializations. Hence I feel it loses its meaning. –  pepper_chico Feb 15 '13 at 4:38
    
I guess it may be yet another example of how handle semantics are from another kind. The same problem is faced with default_delete when one employs unique_ptr for handles. Showing again it wasn't meant to fit this. –  pepper_chico Feb 15 '13 at 5:53
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