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Im using the following function to calculate the number of leap days between two years:

static int CountLeapDays(int startYear, int endYear) 
{
    int Days = 0;

    while (true)
    {
        if ((startYear % 4 == 0 && startYear % 100 != 0) || startYear % 400 == 0)
            Days++;
        if (startYear + 1 == endYear) break;
        startYear++;
    }

    return Days;
}

Is there another way to write this so it doesnt need to loop?

share|improve this question
    
Supposing the inputs are 2000 and 2012; there were 4 leap years in that period (2000, 2004, 2008, 2012). Is that the answer you want? It treats things as though the first date is 1st Jan [start] and the last 31st Dec [end], as a sweeping generality. OTOH, between 1999 and 2011, there were only 3 leap years, even though there was a gap of 12 years, just the same. And between 1997 and 2015, there were 4 leap years. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 14 '13 at 15:37
    
@JonathanLeffler It should only count the leap days in between the two years, so first date is 31st Dec [start] and last date is 1st Jan [end] –  Muis Feb 14 '13 at 15:42
    
OK...and so if the first year is the same as the last year, the answer is zero. If the first year is after that last year, should that be an error, zero, or something else? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 14 '13 at 15:46
    
@JonathanLeffler Correct! And it doesnt need to give an error, I handle input validation at a higher level. –  Muis Feb 14 '13 at 15:59
    
public static in C??? –  Alexey Frunze Feb 14 '13 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can avoid all loops if you are careful with your analysis.

CountLeapDays

Algorithm comments

/*
** Count the number of   4-year     leap years.
** Count the number of 100-year non-leap years.
** Count the number of 400-year     leap years.
**
** Switchover between 20th and 21st centuries: 2000 was a leap year.
** Early        Later year
**       1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
** 1996    0     0    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2    2    2    2    3
** 1997    -     0    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2    2    2    2    3
** 1998    -     -    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2    2    2    2    3
** 1999    -     -    -    0    0    1    1    1    1    2    2    2    2    3
** 2000    -     -    -    -    0    0    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 2001    -     -    -    -    -    0    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 2002    -     -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 2003    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 2004    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    0    0    1
** 2005    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    0    1
** 2006    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    1
** 2007    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    1
** 2008    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0
**
** Switchover between 19th and 20th centuries: 1900 was not a leap year.
** Early        Later year
**       1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
** 1896    0     0    0    0    0   *0   *0   *0   *0   *1   *1   *1   *1   *2
** 1897    -     0    0    0    0   *0   *0   *0   *0   *1   *1   *1   *1   *2
** 1898    -     -    0    0    0   *0   *0   *0   *0   *1   *1   *1   *1   *2
** 1899    -     -    -    0    0   *0   *0   *0   *0   *1   *1   *1   *1   *2
** 1900    -     -    -    -    0    0    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 1901    -     -    -    -    -    0    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 1902    -     -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 1903    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    1    1    1    1    2
** 1904    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    0    0    1
** 1905    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    0    1
** 1906    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    0    1
** 1907    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0    1
** 1908    -     -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    0    0
**
** The dashes can be returned as zero as a special case (invalid input).
** The leading diagonal (zeros) are a special case.
**
** The starred values are 'exceptional', because the (end year - 1) is
** in a different century from the start year.
** Note that the corresponding positions in the other table are doubly
** exceptional because they could be calculated as (end year - 1) is in
** a different century from the start year (one smaller) and (end year -
** 1) is in a different quad-century (one larger) for a net change of
** zero.  This matters if the date ranges get bigger (1890..2130, for
** example).
*/

#include <assert.h>

extern int CountLeapDays(int lo, int hi);   // Should be in a header

CountLeapDays function

int CountLeapDays(int lo, int hi)
{
    assert(lo >= 1800);
    assert(hi <= 9999);
    assert(lo <= hi);

    /* Covers wild inputs */
    /* Beware: 1600 was not a leap year under the Julian calendar then in effect */
    if (lo > hi || lo < 1800 || hi > 9999)
        return 0;

    /* Leading diagonal */
    if (lo == hi)
        return 0;

    /* Regular leap years */
    int lo_4 = (lo - 0) / 4;    /* 500 */
    int hi_4 = (hi - 1) / 4;    /* 502 */
    int diff = hi_4 - lo_4;     /*   2 */

    /* Century years are not leap years */
    int lo_c = (lo - 0) / 100;
    int hi_c = (hi - 1) / 100;
    diff -= hi_c - lo_c;

    /* Quad-century years are leap years */
    int lo_q = (lo - 0) / 400;
    int hi_q = (hi - 1) / 400;
    diff += hi_q - lo_q;

    return(diff);
}

You can decide whether it is a worthwhile optimization to test for hi_c != lo_c and only do the subtraction and quad-century calculation if that's true. The calculation as written is neatly symmetric (and the - 0 terms are there for the symmetry too; the compiler will discard the subtraction).

Test code

Test data

The test data was generated from the tables in the comments by a Perl script.

#include <stdio.h>

static struct test
{
    int lo;
    int hi;
    int num;
} tests[] =
{
    { 1996, 1996, 0 },
    { 1996, 1997, 0 },
    { 1996, 1998, 0 },
    { 1996, 1999, 0 },
    { 1996, 2000, 0 },
    { 1996, 2001, 1 },
    { 1996, 2002, 1 },
    { 1996, 2003, 1 },
    { 1996, 2004, 1 },
    { 1996, 2005, 2 },
    { 1996, 2006, 2 },
    { 1996, 2007, 2 },
    { 1996, 2008, 2 },
    { 1996, 2009, 3 },
    { 1997, 1997, 0 },
    { 1997, 1998, 0 },
    { 1997, 1999, 0 },
    { 1997, 2000, 0 },
    { 1997, 2001, 1 },
    { 1997, 2002, 1 },
    { 1997, 2003, 1 },
    { 1997, 2004, 1 },
    { 1997, 2005, 2 },
    { 1997, 2006, 2 },
    { 1997, 2007, 2 },
    { 1997, 2008, 2 },
    { 1997, 2009, 3 },
    { 1998, 1998, 0 },
    { 1998, 1999, 0 },
    { 1998, 2000, 0 },
    { 1998, 2001, 1 },
    { 1998, 2002, 1 },
    { 1998, 2003, 1 },
    { 1998, 2004, 1 },
    { 1998, 2005, 2 },
    { 1998, 2006, 2 },
    { 1998, 2007, 2 },
    { 1998, 2008, 2 },
    { 1998, 2009, 3 },
    { 1999, 1999, 0 },
    { 1999, 2000, 0 },
    { 1999, 2001, 1 },
    { 1999, 2002, 1 },
    { 1999, 2003, 1 },
    { 1999, 2004, 1 },
    { 1999, 2005, 2 },
    { 1999, 2006, 2 },
    { 1999, 2007, 2 },
    { 1999, 2008, 2 },
    { 1999, 2009, 3 },
    { 2000, 2000, 0 },
    { 2000, 2001, 0 },
    { 2000, 2002, 0 },
    { 2000, 2003, 0 },
    { 2000, 2004, 0 },
    { 2000, 2005, 1 },
    { 2000, 2006, 1 },
    { 2000, 2007, 1 },
    { 2000, 2008, 1 },
    { 2000, 2009, 2 },
    { 2001, 2001, 0 },
    { 2001, 2002, 0 },
    { 2001, 2003, 0 },
    { 2001, 2004, 0 },
    { 2001, 2005, 1 },
    { 2001, 2006, 1 },
    { 2001, 2007, 1 },
    { 2001, 2008, 1 },
    { 2001, 2009, 2 },
    { 2002, 2002, 0 },
    { 2002, 2003, 0 },
    { 2002, 2004, 0 },
    { 2002, 2005, 1 },
    { 2002, 2006, 1 },
    { 2002, 2007, 1 },
    { 2002, 2008, 1 },
    { 2002, 2009, 2 },
    { 2003, 2003, 0 },
    { 2003, 2004, 0 },
    { 2003, 2005, 1 },
    { 2003, 2006, 1 },
    { 2003, 2007, 1 },
    { 2003, 2008, 1 },
    { 2003, 2009, 2 },
    { 2004, 2004, 0 },
    { 2004, 2005, 0 },
    { 2004, 2006, 0 },
    { 2004, 2007, 0 },
    { 2004, 2008, 0 },
    { 2004, 2009, 1 },
    { 2005, 2005, 0 },
    { 2005, 2006, 0 },
    { 2005, 2007, 0 },
    { 2005, 2008, 0 },
    { 2005, 2009, 1 },
    { 2006, 2006, 0 },
    { 2006, 2007, 0 },
    { 2006, 2008, 0 },
    { 2006, 2009, 1 },
    { 2007, 2007, 0 },
    { 2007, 2008, 0 },
    { 2007, 2009, 1 },
    { 2008, 2008, 0 },
    { 2008, 2009, 0 },
    { 1896, 1896, 0 },
    { 1896, 1897, 0 },
    { 1896, 1898, 0 },
    { 1896, 1899, 0 },
    { 1896, 1900, 0 },
    { 1896, 1901, 0 },
    { 1896, 1902, 0 },
    { 1896, 1903, 0 },
    { 1896, 1904, 0 },
    { 1896, 1905, 1 },
    { 1896, 1906, 1 },
    { 1896, 1907, 1 },
    { 1896, 1908, 1 },
    { 1896, 1909, 2 },
    { 1897, 1897, 0 },
    { 1897, 1898, 0 },
    { 1897, 1899, 0 },
    { 1897, 1900, 0 },
    { 1897, 1901, 0 },
    { 1897, 1902, 0 },
    { 1897, 1903, 0 },
    { 1897, 1904, 0 },
    { 1897, 1905, 1 },
    { 1897, 1906, 1 },
    { 1897, 1907, 1 },
    { 1897, 1908, 1 },
    { 1897, 1909, 2 },
    { 1898, 1898, 0 },
    { 1898, 1899, 0 },
    { 1898, 1900, 0 },
    { 1898, 1901, 0 },
    { 1898, 1902, 0 },
    { 1898, 1903, 0 },
    { 1898, 1904, 0 },
    { 1898, 1905, 1 },
    { 1898, 1906, 1 },
    { 1898, 1907, 1 },
    { 1898, 1908, 1 },
    { 1898, 1909, 2 },
    { 1899, 1899, 0 },
    { 1899, 1900, 0 },
    { 1899, 1901, 0 },
    { 1899, 1902, 0 },
    { 1899, 1903, 0 },
    { 1899, 1904, 0 },
    { 1899, 1905, 1 },
    { 1899, 1906, 1 },
    { 1899, 1907, 1 },
    { 1899, 1908, 1 },
    { 1899, 1909, 2 },
    { 1900, 1900, 0 },
    { 1900, 1901, 0 },
    { 1900, 1902, 0 },
    { 1900, 1903, 0 },
    { 1900, 1904, 0 },
    { 1900, 1905, 1 },
    { 1900, 1906, 1 },
    { 1900, 1907, 1 },
    { 1900, 1908, 1 },
    { 1900, 1909, 2 },
    { 1901, 1901, 0 },
    { 1901, 1902, 0 },
    { 1901, 1903, 0 },
    { 1901, 1904, 0 },
    { 1901, 1905, 1 },
    { 1901, 1906, 1 },
    { 1901, 1907, 1 },
    { 1901, 1908, 1 },
    { 1901, 1909, 2 },
    { 1902, 1902, 0 },
    { 1902, 1903, 0 },
    { 1902, 1904, 0 },
    { 1902, 1905, 1 },
    { 1902, 1906, 1 },
    { 1902, 1907, 1 },
    { 1902, 1908, 1 },
    { 1902, 1909, 2 },
    { 1903, 1903, 0 },
    { 1903, 1904, 0 },
    { 1903, 1905, 1 },
    { 1903, 1906, 1 },
    { 1903, 1907, 1 },
    { 1903, 1908, 1 },
    { 1903, 1909, 2 },
    { 1904, 1904, 0 },
    { 1904, 1905, 0 },
    { 1904, 1906, 0 },
    { 1904, 1907, 0 },
    { 1904, 1908, 0 },
    { 1904, 1909, 1 },
    { 1905, 1905, 0 },
    { 1905, 1906, 0 },
    { 1905, 1907, 0 },
    { 1905, 1908, 0 },
    { 1905, 1909, 1 },
    { 1906, 1906, 0 },
    { 1906, 1907, 0 },
    { 1906, 1908, 0 },
    { 1906, 1909, 1 },
    { 1907, 1907, 0 },
    { 1907, 1908, 0 },
    { 1907, 1909, 1 },
    { 1908, 1908, 0 },
    { 1908, 1909, 0 },
};
enum { NUM_TESTS = sizeof(tests) / sizeof(tests[0]) };

Test functions

static void test_data(void)
{
    int pass = 0;
    int fail = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < NUM_TESTS; i++)
    {
        int res = CountLeapDays(tests[i].lo, tests[i].hi);
        if (res != tests[i].num)
        {
            printf("!! FAIL !! %4d..%4d wanted %d actual %d\n", tests[i].lo, tests[i].hi, tests[i].num, res);
            fail++;
        }
        else
        {
            printf("== PASS == %4d..%4d = %d\n", tests[i].lo, tests[i].hi, tests[i].num);
            pass++;
        }
    }
    if (fail == 0)
        printf("== PASS == %d tests passed\n", pass);
    else
        printf("!! FAIL !! %d tests out of %d failed\n", fail, pass+fail);
}

static void test_range(int min, int max)
{
    for (int lo = min; lo < max; lo++)
    {
        for (int hi = lo; hi < max; hi++)
        {
            printf("%d..%d = %d leap days\n", lo, hi, CountLeapDays(lo, hi));
        }
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    test_data();
    test_range(1997, 2016);
    test_range(1891, 1909);
    return(0);
}

The test code passes the 208 test cases that are formally verified from the data. It goes on to illustrate 361 cases spanning both the 19th-20th and 20th-21st century time spans.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Almost unbelievable how much time and effort you spended just to answer this question! Thank you very much! –  Muis Feb 14 '13 at 23:17
    
The tables were key to working out what was necessary. Hacking them with Perl was pretty easy. The test code is in a standard scheme I use for unit-testing similar calculations (including date calculations) — inputs and expected output; compare and complain. I had those tests in place before I had a working algorithm; they were key to getting it to work. The main itself is trivial. That really only leaves the algorithm, but even that fell into place fairly quickly once I'd got the tables with the inputs and required outputs. But yes, it was quite a lot of work...despite my minimizing it. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 14 '13 at 23:46
    
@Joshua: FYI: my code doesn't produce exactly the same answer as your code. Even after upgrading it to handle start year the same as end year (if (startYear >= endYear) return 0;), the answers are different. Your code counts the leap day in the start year (using 1st January [Start]). –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 17 '13 at 3:37

There are probably much faster alternatives but this version at least reduces the number of loops by ~75%

public static int CountLeapDays(int startYear, int endYear) 
{
    int Days = 0;

    // round startYear up to the nearest multiple of 4
    startYear += 3;
    startYear &= ~3;

    while (startYear <= endYear) {
        if (startYear % 100 != 0 || startYear % 400 == 0) {
            Days++;
        }
        startYear += 4;
    }

    return Days;
}
share|improve this answer

You could loop a lot less by:

  1. There are 97 leap days in every 400 years. This can be calculated without looping.
  2. Divide the number of years in the remaining range by 4 and add it to the number from step 1 for an approximate answer.
  3. Subtract one for any years within the range that are multiples of 100 and not multiples of 400. You can start your loop from (startyear+99)/100*100 and increment by 100 until your value is > endYear. This will only loop a maximum of three times.
share|improve this answer
    
Theoretically, yes. However, the year 1600 wasn't a leap year in most countries, and we don't know if 2400 will ever happen. :-) –  Bo Persson Feb 14 '13 at 16:51
    
@BoPersson 1600 was most definitely a leap year in all countries. The problem is, rather, that 1700 was in some of them. I was kind of assuming proleptic gregorian calendar, since that's what the code in the question is doing. –  Random832 Feb 16 '13 at 22:15
    
Ok, let me rephrase this: In the year 1600 most countries didn't follow the current rules, in the year 2000 they did, but we know nothing at all about the year 2400. That makes it hard to give a rule about any 400 year period. –  Bo Persson Feb 16 '13 at 22:29

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