Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an Apache/PHP based server on which I've made Apache execute js, html and css files as PHP via the following line in /etc/mime.types:

application/x-httpd-php phtml pht php js html css

We did this because even though any files we save as .html/.js/.css are almost entirely non-PHP, we need to do a bit of templating in them (for example, changing the domain of some URLs depending upon whether we are on the live or testing server).

The trouble is, this method of making Apache treat those files as PHP causes them to be returned with the wrong MIME type, which at the very least breaks css files in Chromium and probably has nasty effects in other browsers too.

Is there a way I can tell Apache to execute these files as PHP but still output them with the correct MIME type for their file extension? I don't want to have to manually paste

<?php
  header("Content-type: text/css");
?>

at the top of all of our .css files.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe PHP's auto-prepend would do the trick? –  satyrwilder Feb 14 '13 at 15:44
    
@LeahL. Waht's that? –  Praveen Kumar Feb 14 '13 at 15:44
    

3 Answers 3

We did this because even though any files we save as .html/.js/.css are almost entirely non-PHP, we need to do a bit of templating in them

Why not do the dynamic parts in the main document then, where you are dynamic anyway? Running all the resources through the PHP interpreter is such a waste.

For JavaScript:

<script>
domain = "<? echo $domain; ?>";  <----- dynamic bits here
</script>
<script src="xyz.js"></script>   <----- you can use them in xyz.js

For CSS:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="stylesheet.css">

<style type="text/css">
 /* insert dynamic CSS here, overriding parts from the static style sheet */

 .my_div { color: <? echo $color; ?> }

</style>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Hey, this idea is good man! :) Thanks... :) –  Praveen Kumar Feb 14 '13 at 15:44
    
Yeah, I'd considered the efficiency implications and you're almost certainly right that in the long term we should change this. However, doing things your way requires that either 1) we have a load of boilerplate we copy to every single HTML document where we include one of these CSS files, or 2) we have a PHP script/function we can run wherever we want to include one of these CSS files that spits out the link and style tags as you've shown above. Option #1 is massive code duplication. Option #2 requires having two files for every stylesheet we want to use templating in instead of one. –  Mark Amery Feb 14 '13 at 16:02

You can do it in two ways:

  1. Create a .htaccess file.

    Now inside this file, make all the PHP files to be read as either .js or .css. Ideally, you will be having files like: style.css.php, scripts.js.php and are executed by Apache but the user will be getting the URL as style.css, scripts.js, etc.

  2. Using Mime types.

    As you already said, by using the following, you can make these execute in the PHP.

    application/x-httpd-php phtml pht php js html css
    

    Or another way is this:

    <FilesMatch "^.*?css*?$">
        SetHandler php5-script
    </FilesMatch>
    
share|improve this answer
    
I tried to use method #2; I removed 'css' from the end of my line in /etc/mime.types and pasted the FilesMatch tag you provided into my httpd.conf, but it didn't change anything; I'm still getting css files spat out with the wrong MIME type. Have I misunderstood your instructions? –  Mark Amery Feb 14 '13 at 15:57
    
Er... It works here... What browser are you using? –  Praveen Kumar Feb 14 '13 at 16:03
    
Chromium. MIME type as shown in developer tools is still coming through as 'text/html'. I've cleared my browser cache, so that's not the problem. It's definitely a MIME type problem, because if I put header("Content-type: text/css"); at the top of an offending CSS file, everything works fine. –  Mark Amery Feb 14 '13 at 16:09
    
Am using Google Chrome 24. It works perfectly fine... Content type is text/css, although internally it is style.css.php. I guess the issue should be with your Apache Server. I am using WAMP Server. –  Praveen Kumar Feb 14 '13 at 16:10
    
Praveen, let me clarify - it broke for me when I tried to use your second way. I haven't tried your first. –  Mark Amery Feb 14 '13 at 16:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems worth me noting that the only reason I ever ended up needing to ask this question was the wrong-headed approach I'd taken to having .js and .css files executed by PHP.

Don't modify your mime.types file to achieve this. Instead, in your Apache config (or in a .htaccess file), use invocations like this:

<Files *.js>
    ForceType application/x-httpd-php
    Header set Content-Type "application/javascript"
</Files>
<Files *.css>
    ForceType application/x-httpd-php
    Header set Content-Type "text/css"
</Files>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.