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I have a cleaner class that implements IDataReader, what it does is it filters any DateTime values that are outside of SQL Server's DateTime range and returns DBNull instead (The output of this class is being fed in to a SqlBulkCopy and my data source can return dates that are before 1/1/1753)

My issue is one of the functions of the interface returns a new IDataReader, what I would like is any derived class would not need to override the function to return a new object itself. Here is a example

public class SqlServerDataCleaner : IDataReader
{
    public SqlServerDataCleaner(IDataReader dataSource)
    {
        this.dataSource = dataSource;
        //(Snip)
    }

    //(Snip)

    public virtual IDataReader GetData(int i)
    {
        return new SqlServerDataCleaner(dataSource.GetData(i));
    }

}

class SqlServerDataCleanerDerived : SqlServerDataCleaner
{
    public SqlServerDataCleanerDerived (IDataReader dataSource) 
        : base(dataSource)
    {
    }

    //(Snip)

    //Need to return the correct class
    public override IDataReader GetData(int i)
    {
        return new SqlServerDataCleanerDerived (dataSource.GetData(i));
    }

}

Is there any way to remove the need for the override for GetData so the parent class will automatically create the most derived form of the class in it's copy of GetData (assume all derived classes will always have a Classname(IDataReader) constructor)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Reflection to the rescue:

public virtual IDataReader GetData(int i)
{
  return (IDataReader)Activator.CreateInstance(GetType(), dataSource.GetData(i));
}

GetType always returns the type of the current instance, i.e., for a SqlServerDataCleaner instance it returns typeof(SqlServerDataCleaner) and for a SqlServerDataCleanerDerived instance it returns typeof(SqlServerDataCleanerDerived). You can pass this type to the Activator.CreateInstance method.

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that definitely works, and perhaps this would be better in Stack Overflow Chat(which my employer blocks), but doesn't something about this just seem wrong/smell? –  hometoast Feb 14 '13 at 16:22
    
Reflection always comes with the price of losing the safety of type checking at compile-time and a small performance hit. I'm not sure if it's justified here; I would probably go with just repeating the method in each class. –  dtb Feb 14 '13 at 16:26
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