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This works:

class ABean implements A {
  protected String field1;
  ...
  protected String fieldn;

  public String getField1() {
   return field1;
  }
  ...
}


class BBean extends ABean {
  public BBean(A a) {
    super();
    this.field1=a.getField1();
    ...
    this.fieldn=a.getFieldn();
  }
}

But writing this constructor B(A a) is cumbersome, not really practical, and error prone because if I add or remove fields in A, then I need to modify that constructor and may sometimes forget to initialize some of the fields present in A.

I suppose I could implement clone for ABean, but that would have similar issues (because the clone implementation would need to be updated when I add/remove fields) and that would also not allow me to have a BBean(A a) constructor; only a BBean(ABean a) constructor unless I make the clone() part of the interface also.

So... is there a cleaner, better way of implementing BBean(A a)?

share|improve this question
    
Which classes do you have access to? A, ABean, BBean? – wmorrison365 Feb 15 '13 at 8:42
    
@wmorrison365 I have access to both classes. I am starting to realize that I may be chasing a ghost. After all, there are many methods that list fields explicitly, like equal, hashCode, toString even... and that need to be modified when new fields are added/removed. The only difference is that these methods can be created automatically with Eclipse. So no magic bullets but 2 approaches: list all fields explicitly and move the code in A with the A-constructor approach you suggest to at least localize the field changes, or use reflection as suggested by Edgard. Still wondering... – Lolo Feb 15 '13 at 17:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of using inheritance, try using composition. That is, instead of BBean extends ABean, make your BBean have a constructor BBean(ABean a). That way you've shielded yourself from all the details of how to construct a new ABean in BBean's code.

share|improve this answer
    
I assume you meant "make your BBean have a field ABean, no? Yes, you are correct that using composition would get around my issue. But unfortunately, I am building on existing code that already has a number of assumptions on BBean extending ABean. So I still need a solution for the case when I use inheritance. – Lolo Feb 14 '13 at 17:33
    
I am accepting your answer because since I wrote that question, I have found that using composition is typically what solves that types of problems most elegantly. – Lolo Apr 17 '13 at 14:40

What about implementing an "A"-constructor (copy-constructor) on your ABean as follows:

class ABean implements A {
    protected String field1;
    ...
    protected String fieldn;

    public String getField1() {
        return field1;
    }
    ...
    public ABean(A other) {
        this.field1=other.getField1();
        ...
        this.fieldn=other.getFieldn();
    }
}


class BBean extends ABean {
    public BBean(A a) {
        super(a);
    }
}

This way, your "copy-constructor" mapping for A's is all in your ABean.

share|improve this answer
    
This works but has the same issues I am trying to solve. Namely: cumbersome (have to write explicitly all fields) and, more importantly, error prone (if I add a field in A and forget to update ABean(A other), I will be in trouble. – Lolo Feb 14 '13 at 17:35
    
Oh, I see. I'd assumed you wanted to localise the field changes away from client classes (such as BBean) so that you wouldn't have to have to initialise values in each. – wmorrison365 Feb 15 '13 at 8:40
    
Ok, so not pretty but common in projects requiring large BOs with large number of properties... You could just give ABean a map of values with generic Map setters). It ensures your BBean(A) constructor - or an ABean(A) copy-constructor - isn't cumbersome and that no new values are missed. Of course, this means your BO isn't any longer strongly-typed and isn't very OO. You could, of course supplement the Map-based API with real accessors for well-known values. – wmorrison365 Feb 15 '13 at 8:48

you can use reflection:

class A {}

class B {
public B(A a) {
    String methodName = null;
    try {
        Field[] fields = a.getClass().getDeclaredFields();
        for (Field field : fields) {
            methodName = field.getName().substring(0, 1).toUpperCase()
                    + field.getName()
                            .substring(1, field.getName().length());
            field.get(a);
            this.getClass().getMethod("set" + methodName, field.getClass()).invoke(a, field.get(a));
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, that allows me not to re-write that method every time I add/remove fields in A. I like this. But reading the doc for getDeclaredFields, it says that it does not return inherited fields. That seems an issue. Also, I may be in trouble if A has fields for which a getter isn't available. I am not too concerned about that second issue (unlikely, and can be resolved by adding a try/catch for each getMethod invocation), but the second issue seems a problem. – Lolo Feb 14 '13 at 17:45
    
put this method in class A , and alter the fields value direct <br> this.getClass().getDeclaredFields()[0].set(this, new String()); – Edgard Leal Feb 14 '13 at 18:54

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