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Let's take a class called Cls:

public class Cls
{
    public int SequenceNumber { get; set; }
    public int Value { get; set; }
}

Now, let's populate some collection with following elements:

Sequence
Number      Value
========    =====
1           9
2           9
3           15
4           15
5           15
6           30
7           9

What I need to do, is to enumerate over Sequence Numbers and check if the next element has the same value. If yes, values are aggregated and so, desired output is as following:

Sequence    Sequence
Number      Number
From        To          Value
========    ========    =====
1           2           9
3           5           15
6           6           30
7           7           9

How can I perform this operation using LINQ query?

share|improve this question
1  
I reckon you're gonna need to use a standard for-each loop here, interesting question though, and well put +1 –  RobJohnson Feb 14 '13 at 16:20
4  
Very interesting question, but I somehow doubt that LINQ version will be much more readable than the foreach loop version. I'm hoping an answer here can prove me otherwise. –  l46kok Feb 14 '13 at 16:26
    
You could group by value and then search the grouped collections for contiguous sequences, then split by them and sort by "from", but I think I agree the imperative version won't be much less readable in this particular case. –  Honza Brestan Feb 14 '13 at 16:29
1  
See also: stackoverflow.com/q/7064157/21727 –  mbeckish Feb 14 '13 at 17:35
    
See the same problem at CodeGolf: codegolf.stackexchange.com/questions/10797/… –  Dariusz Woźniak Mar 17 '13 at 18:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can use Linq's GroupBy in a modified version which groups only if the two items are adjacent, then it's easy as:

var result = classes
    .GroupAdjacent(c => c.Value)
    .Select(g => new { 
        SequenceNumFrom = g.Min(c => c.SequenceNumber),
        SequenceNumTo = g.Max(c => c.SequenceNumber),  
        Value = g.Key
    });

foreach (var x in result)
    Console.WriteLine("SequenceNumFrom:{0} SequenceNumTo:{1} Value:{2}", x.SequenceNumFrom, x.SequenceNumTo, x.Value);

DEMO

Result:

SequenceNumFrom:1  SequenceNumTo:2  Value:9
SequenceNumFrom:3  SequenceNumTo:5  Value:15
SequenceNumFrom:6  SequenceNumTo:6  Value:30
SequenceNumFrom:7  SequenceNumTo:7  Value:9

This is the extension method to to group adjacent items:

public static IEnumerable<IGrouping<TKey, TSource>> GroupAdjacent<TSource, TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
        Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
    {
        TKey last = default(TKey);
        bool haveLast = false;
        List<TSource> list = new List<TSource>();
        foreach (TSource s in source)
        {
            TKey k = keySelector(s);
            if (haveLast)
            {
                if (!k.Equals(last))
                {
                    yield return new GroupOfAdjacent<TSource, TKey>(list, last);
                    list = new List<TSource>();
                    list.Add(s);
                    last = k;
                }
                else
                {
                    list.Add(s);
                    last = k;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                list.Add(s);
                last = k;
                haveLast = true;
            }
        }
        if (haveLast)
            yield return new GroupOfAdjacent<TSource, TKey>(list, last);
    }
}

and the class used:

public class GroupOfAdjacent<TSource, TKey> : IEnumerable<TSource>, IGrouping<TKey, TSource>
{
    public TKey Key { get; set; }
    private List<TSource> GroupList { get; set; }
    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return ((System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<TSource>)this).GetEnumerator();
    }
    System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<TSource> System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<TSource>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        foreach (var s in GroupList)
            yield return s;
    }
    public GroupOfAdjacent(List<TSource> source, TKey key)
    {
        GroupList = source;
        Key = key;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Great answer, that's a lot of code though, I think I would just use a regular for-each loop and build a new collection that way –  RobJohnson Feb 14 '13 at 16:36
4  
Lots of code? It's a completely reusable, generalized solution. Not a lot, given that. Fantastic answer and a new tool for the toolbox. +1 –  Pete Feb 14 '13 at 16:39

You can use this linq query

Demo

var values = (new[] { 9, 9, 15, 15, 15, 30, 9 }).Select((x, i) => new { x, i });

var query = from v in values
            let firstNonValue = values.Where(v2 => v2.i >= v.i && v2.x != v.x).FirstOrDefault()
            let grouping = firstNonValue == null ? int.MaxValue : firstNonValue.i
            group v by grouping into v
            select new
            {
              From = v.Min(y => y.i) + 1,
              To = v.Max(y => y.i) + 1,
              Value = v.Min(y => y.x)
            };
share|improve this answer

You can do it like this:

var all = new [] {
    new Cls(1, 9)
,   new Cls(2, 9)
,   new Cls(3, 15)
,   new Cls(4, 15)
,   new Cls(5, 15)
,   new Cls(6, 30)
,   new Cls(7, 9)
};
var f = all.First();
var res = all.Skip(1).Aggregate(
    new List<Run> {new Run {From = f.SequenceNumber, To = f.SequenceNumber, Value = f.Value} }
,   (p, v) => {
    if (v.Value == p.Last().Value) {
        p.Last().To = v.SequenceNumber;
    } else {
        p.Add(new Run {From = v.SequenceNumber, To = v.SequenceNumber, Value = v.Value});
    }
    return p;
});
foreach (var r in res) {
    Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1} : {2}", r.From, r.To, r.Value);
}

The idea is to use Aggregate creatively: starting with a list consisting of a single Run, examine the content of the list we've got so far at each stage of aggregation (the if statement in the lambda). Depending on the last value, either continue the old run, or start a new one.

Here is a demo on ideone.

share|improve this answer
1  
IMHO it's better to use a foreach loop when there is that much code in a lambda. –  juharr Feb 14 '13 at 16:38
    
@juharr It's not just the amount of code, it's the fact that it's causing side effects and depending on those side effects. When the important parts of any LINQ call cause side effects it usually means that portion should just be in a foreach. –  Servy Feb 14 '13 at 16:42
    
@Servy I agree - I would not use LINQ for run detection precisely for the reason of side effects. I view this as a cure answer to a LINQ puzzle, because the OP asked for LINQ explicitly. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 14 '13 at 17:49

I was able to accomplish it by creating a custom extension method.

static class Extensions {
  internal static IEnumerable<Tuple<int, int, int>> GroupAdj(this IEnumerable<Cls> enumerable) {
    Cls start = null;
    Cls end = null;
    int value = Int32.MinValue;

    foreach (Cls cls in enumerable) {
      if (start == null) {
        start = cls;
        end = cls;
        continue;
      }

      if (start.Value == cls.Value) {
        end = cls;
        continue;
      }

      yield return Tuple.Create(start.SequenceNumber, end.SequenceNumber, start.Value);
      start = cls;
      end = cls;
    }

    yield return Tuple.Create(start.SequenceNumber, end.SequenceNumber, start.Value);
  }
}

Here's the implementation:

static void Main() {
  List<Cls> items = new List<Cls> {
    new Cls { SequenceNumber = 1, Value = 9 },
    new Cls { SequenceNumber = 2, Value = 9 },
    new Cls { SequenceNumber = 3, Value = 15 },
    new Cls { SequenceNumber = 4, Value = 15 },
    new Cls { SequenceNumber = 5, Value = 15 },
    new Cls { SequenceNumber = 6, Value = 30 },
    new Cls { SequenceNumber = 7, Value = 9 }
  };

  Console.WriteLine("From  To    Value");
  Console.WriteLine("===== ===== =====");
  foreach (var item in items.OrderBy(i => i.SequenceNumber).GroupAdj()) {
    Console.WriteLine("{0,-5} {1,-5} {2,-5}", item.Item1, item.Item2, item.Item3);
  }
}

And the expected output:

From  To    Value
===== ===== =====
1     2     9
3     5     15
6     6     30
7     7     9
share|improve this answer

Here is an implementation without any helper methods:

var grp = 0;
var results =
from i
in
input.Zip(
    input.Skip(1).Concat(new [] {input.Last ()}),
    (n1, n2) => Tuple.Create(
        n1, (n2.Value == n1.Value) ? grp : grp++
    )
)
group i by i.Item2 into gp
select new {SequenceNumFrom = gp.Min(x => x.Item1.SequenceNumber),SequenceNumTo = gp.Max(x => x.Item1.SequenceNumber), Value = gp.Min(x => x.Item1.Value)};

The idea is:

  • Keep track of your own grouping indicator, grp.
  • Join each item of the collection to the next item in the collection (via Skip(1) and Zip).
  • If the Values match, they are in the same group; otherwise, increment grp to signal the start of the next group.
share|improve this answer

Untested dark magic follows. The imperative version seems like it would be easier in this case.

IEnumerable<Cls> data = ...;
var query = data
    .GroupBy(x => x.Value)
    .Select(g => new
    {
        Value = g.Key,
        Sequences = g
            .OrderBy(x => x.SequenceNumber)
            .Select((x,i) => new
            {
                x.SequenceNumber,
                OffsetSequenceNumber = x.SequenceNumber - i
            })
            .GroupBy(x => x.OffsetSequenceNumber)
            .Select(g => g
                .Select(x => x.SequenceNumber)
                .OrderBy(x => x)
                .ToList())
            .ToList()
    })
    .SelectMany(x => x.Sequences
        .Select(s => new { First = s.First(), Last = s.Last(), x.Value }))
    .OrderBy(x => x.First)
    .ToList();
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