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I have two .NET 4.0 WinForms applications that (primarily) read geographic data from shared MemoryMappedFiles. The end user is free to launch one of the apps or the other or run both at the same time. The first app that gets opened creates the named MemoryMapFile-s, the second one opens the already existing ones. However, opening the existing named MemoryMappedFile seems to be unreliable. It works about 80% of the cases, but around 20% of the cases it fails with FileNotFoundException. The symptom is not safely reproducable, it seems to be sheer luck when it fails and when it succeeds.

Here is the code used by both apps to get the MemoryMappedFiles:

private static MemoryMappedFile GetMemoryMappedFile(string filePath)
{
    string mapName = filePath; // I have also tried here @"Global\myfile", no difference
    MemoryMappedFile mmf = null;
    try 
    { 
        // When the first app executes this step, it always succeeds.
        // When the second app comes here, it fails as it should.
        mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateFromFile(filePath, FileMode.OpenOrCreate,
                              mapName, HundredMB, MemoryMappedFileAccess.ReadWrite); 
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        try 
        { 
            // Opening the already existing named MemoryMappedFile by the SECOND app.
            // This line fails about 20% of the time.
            mmf = MemoryMappedFile.OpenExisting(mapName, 
                                   MemoryMappedFileRights.ReadWrite); 
        } 
        catch (FileNotFoundException ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Yet again, could not open MMF. Life sux.");
        }
    }
    return mmf;
}
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4 Answers 4

 string mapName = filePath;

This looks pretty fundamentally fishy. The filePath string should always refer to the absolute path name of the file. Like "c:\foo\bar\baz.bin", never a relative file name, like "baz.bin". A name like "Global\myfile" is not a path name, it is a memory map name. Which is what another process uses to open the mapping, it doesn't know or care about the actual file that acts as the backing store for the map.

A very common way this will fail is when your program's working directory (Environment.CurrentDirectory) is not set where you hope it is set. It has a knack for changing without you realizing, other than seeing that suddenly that CreateFromFile() call fails.

So fix your problem by picking a unique map name that is highly specific to your app. And a file that you select with a full path name. Typically stored in AppData, a folder that you have write access to without UAC elevation.

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How about flipping around the logic? Since the creation of the MMF should be a once-only thing but the opening of the existing one should be the more often case, maybe this will work?

private static MemoryMappedFile GetMemoryMappedFile(string filePath)
{
    var mapName = filePath; // I have also tried here @"Global\myfile", no difference
    MemoryMappedFile mmf = null;

    try
    {
        // When the first app executes this step, it fails as it should.
        // Opening the already existing named MemoryMappedFile by the SECOND app.
        mmf = MemoryMappedFile.OpenExisting(mapName, MemoryMappedFileRights.ReadWrite);
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException)
    {
        try
        {
            // When the first app executes this step, it always succeeds.
            mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateFromFile(
                filePath,
                FileMode.OpenOrCreate,
                mapName,
                HundredMB,
                MemoryMappedFileAccess.ReadWrite);
        }
        catch (IOException ex)
        {
            Console.Error.WriteLine("Yet again, could not open MMF. Life sux: " + ex);
        }
    }

    return mmf;
}
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I also noticed, if I used @"Global\myfile" for the mapName, I had to run as Administrator otherwise I'd get an UnauthorizedAccessException. –  Jesse C. Slicer Feb 14 '13 at 19:12

What you've described seems like a perfectly probable case. What you have is a race condition. For example, the code that throws an exception on CreateFromFile is telling you the file exists. Another process then closes the file before this code reaches the OpenExisting. OpenExisting is then called and fails because the file no longer exists. This is a valid case that you need to write code for.

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While you are technically correct, this is unlikely the real problem. The applications create/open the MMF when they launch and close them only when they are killed. Furthermore, the apps are open hours long. Always the second one fails, when it gets opened. –  user256890 Feb 14 '13 at 16:47
    
Well, you really haven't provided any information to suggest that your code is not at fault and the that .NET Framework's implementation of MemoryMappedFile is either flawed or not documented properly. Everything you've described suggests you have a race condition more than anything else. –  Peter Ritchie Feb 14 '13 at 17:20
    
Try using File.Exists to see if it returns false when FileNotFoundException occurs. That's yet another race condition; but it should be false more than true with a 20% failure rate if your problem truly is a race condition. If it's always true, then yes, you likely don't have a race condition in your code. –  Peter Ritchie Feb 14 '13 at 17:23
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I am the author of the question, and I am a fool. The MMF works as it supposed to. The failures were caused by a second method (written by me quite some time ago), where I create MMF-s but I applied there a different MMF naming conventions. The code in the question failed (correctly) because some of the MMF-s were created in my second method under wrong names.

I do not delete the question, because there are still valuable answers contributed that might help later readers. Thank you very much for all, who took the time to answer.

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