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I'm trying to write a cmake lists for my Fortran project with one external module, and both have to be linked with an external library that doesn't have any cmake find (findlib) packages. So far, my CMakeLists.txt looks like this:

cmake_minimum_required (VERSION 2.6)

project (Project 1)

enable_language (C Fortran)

set(extern_INCLUDE /home/path/lib/libdir/include/)
set(extern_LIB /home/path/lib/libdir/lib)
include_directories(${extern_INCLUDE})
link_directories (${extern_LIB})

add_library(mymodule STATIC mymodule.f90)
set(main-source_SRC main-source.f)
add_executable(main-source ${main-source_SRC})
#the name of the external library located in /home/path/lib/libdir/lib is    libexternlib.so
target_link_libraries(main-source mymodule externlib) 

A libmymodule.a is created and is definitely not necessary (or a shared one for that matter). I don't want to generate them. How can I avoid its generation and still compile mymodule, generating the .o and .mod to be able to link with the main program and the external lib? The equivalent would be to ifort -c to mymodule and ifort to all .o.

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2 Answers 2

The file libmymodule.a is a static library, and is created because the STATIC option in the add_library() function tells CMake to do so. Instead of STATIC, try using SHARED to create the shared library libmymodule.so - though I'm not sure it's the static bit you're worried about here.

If the external library does not come with a FindLib file, it may be easy enough to create one yourself. There are a number of examples in the FindLibs/ directory of the CMakeFiles package, which provides example CMake files, in particular for Fortran projects: http://cmakefiles.sf.net/

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I'm not trying to create a library, I'm trying to generate a .o and a .mod to link with the main program only. FindLib is not the answer in the Fortran case. –  Ivan Mar 4 '13 at 5:32

You have the source of mymodule. You can include mymodule.f90 in main-source_SRC. That should be enough. I hope the following works, but I cannot test it.

cmake_minimum_required (VERSION 2.6)

project (Project 1)

enable_language (C Fortran)

set(extern_INCLUDE /home/path/lib/libdir/include/)
set(extern_LIB /home/path/lib/libdir/lib)
include_directories(${extern_INCLUDE})
link_directories (${extern_LIB})

set(main-source_SRC main-source.f mymodule.f90)
add_executable(main-source ${main-source_SRC})
#the name of the external library located in /home/path/lib/libdir/lib is    libexternlib.so
target_link_libraries(main-source externlib) 
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Thanks, but it complains saying it can't find main-source /usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lmymodule. –  Ivan Feb 14 '13 at 21:14
    
Sorry, but I have no further idea on this. But did you try set (CMAKE_VERBOSE_MAKEFILE "On"). That will print the commands executed for further debugging. –  Holger Feb 14 '13 at 21:30
    
I think this goes awry because a Fortran module is not the same as an include file. You should be able to fix it by leaving out the include_directories and including the external module in the executable as ${extern_INCLUDE}/mymodule.f90. –  sigma Feb 17 '13 at 22:56
    
Could you provide a simple example of the extern_Include in this case, sigma? –  Ivan Mar 4 '13 at 5:31

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