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I want to spit out RAM usage as a percentage of total RAM using top. The script I have so far is

top -l 1 |
awk '/PhysMem/ {
    print "RAM\nwired:" $2/40.95 "% active:" $4/40.95 "% inactive:" $6/40.95 "% free:" $10/40.95 "%"
}'

I have 4gb RAM, hence divide by 40.95, so this script spits out something that looks like:

RAM
wired:16.1172% active:46.2759% inactive:8.79121% free:28.8156%

I only want it to show the percentages to 1 place past the decimal and I'm not sure how to do this. I looked into using bc but I always get an illegal statement error. Any ideas how to round it to the 1st decimal place within awk?

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1  
why not use free instead? it's much more amenable to parsing/manipulation than top's output is. –  Marc B Feb 14 '13 at 18:34
    
im running osx so there is no free command. have to work with top –  Hat Feb 14 '13 at 18:43
1  
You may find this of interest apple.stackexchange.com/questions/4286/… –  sotapme Feb 15 '13 at 0:06
    
@flapjacks Aside: I needed some very like alias for me (top was slightly too slow). Check out vm_stat | awk -F: 'BEGIN{OFMT="%.f"}; /(free|wired|active)/ {print substr($1, 7),"\r\t\t",($2*4096)/2^20}' –  lukmdo Nov 1 '13 at 14:55

1 Answer 1

There are a few ways to do that with awk:

... | awk '{ print $2/40.95 }' OFMT="%3.1f"

... | awk '{ printf( "%3.1f\n", $2/40.95 )}'

each use the output format %3.1f to handle rounding. So all you need to do is add the argument OFMT="%3.1f" to your awk call. (Or you may prefer a format of %0.1f The 3 just gives a minimum width; the typical format string rules apply. )

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Note that depending on your particular case you may need CONVFMT instead of OFMT — more details here. –  Skippy le Grand Gourou Oct 30 '14 at 10:45

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