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I use the same switch statement over and over, but the functionality in each case my differ.

switch(type){
  case "t1": 
    fnA();
    break;  
  case "t2": 
    fnB();
    break;
  ...
}

switch(type){
  case "t1": 
    fnZ();
    break;  
  case "t2": 
    fnY();
    break;
  ...
}

I don't know if there's a better or more clever way to do this. I couldn't think of anything, so I thought I'd toss it to you fine folks. Thanks in advance.

EDIT: to make more sense of it, think of it like this: in the first switch, depending on the type, data will be inserted added to an object a certain way. In the second switch, data will be deleted from an object a certain way.

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nested switch?? –  Eonasdan Feb 14 '13 at 18:48
    
how many case statements are there? –  Russ Cam Feb 14 '13 at 18:48
    
@RussCam 3 + default in each one. –  Yatrix Feb 14 '13 at 18:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this looks like a good situation to use object-oriented programming.

  1. Create a class for each type
  2. Whenever you need to do something which is doing something differently depending on the type, call type.someFunction(). Make each type class implement this function differently.
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1  
This is the right way to think about solving your problem, but I (among others) don't recommend trying to implement classes in todays' javascript –  naugtur Feb 14 '13 at 19:01

This might be a shot in the dark, but I guess that repeating switch-case multiple times in your code is just a result of a bad architecture decision.

You have probably assigned responsibilities incorrectly.

Asuming you use modules not ObjectOriented stuff - the methods that are being called should be mixins. Or use a decorator pattern.

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I'm creating a widget that either adds html or pulls data from it, depending on what type of elements are being used. So, depending on the element, I have to traverse it's children differently. So if it's a div, I have to look for this, if it's a select, I have to look for that, etc. –  Yatrix Feb 14 '13 at 19:07
1  
Yup, and you should check for it once, and based on that decision create an object for inner use that has correct behaviours under certain method names. And if it's a widget for jquery there's some potential in building this capability inhto the default widget pattern. Sounds fun –  naugtur Feb 14 '13 at 21:42

Usually a switch statement is not a processing bottleneck, so it's the last thing you optimize.

Each case translates onto the CPU as a test and a jump, so think of how many operations your worst case would be and decide whether it's worth fussing over, and how many operations you would actually save (both worst case and average).

Saying that, there's a couple of obvious options. If you have numeric types and they are evenly distributed, you can split your switch statement into multiple switches....

switch(type){
  case "t1": 
    fnA();
    break;  
  case "t2": 
    fnB();
    break;
  ...
}

switch(type){
  case "t1": 
    fnZ();
    break;  
  case "t2": 
    fnY();
    break;
  ...
}

This is of course trickier to maintain, and may rely upon knowledge of constant values that makes your code ugly. It's really just a grungey search tree...

Another way is to put all your cases into functions, and build a tree or hash table that maps each value to a function handler. That way you can always rely on O(logN) search times (or better, in the case of hash tables). I repeat: don't do this unless you have a very good reason to.

Hope that helps give you some insight.

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I'd hesitate implement this solution, because it's not much more concise than a switch and it's more confusing.

function doSwitch(expression, options) {
    options[expression]();
}

doSwitch(type, {
    "t1": fnA,
    "t2": fnB
});

doSwitch(type, {
    "t1": fnZ,
    "t2": fnY
});

Don't do this because of performance -- do this because you have huge repeated switch statements. If you have such statements, you might want to re-evaluate that.

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