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I am simulating a random walk starting from coordinates(0,0). When I do it with a loop it works well:

require(ggplot2)
n <- 1000   #number of walks 

# first solution, w/ loop... works but is SLOOOW
coord <- data.frame (x=0, y=0, step=0) #origin
for (i in 1:n){
  dir <- sample(c("w", "e", "n", "s"), 1) #random direction
  step <- sample(1:4, 1) #how far to go in each walk
  startx <- coord[nrow(coord), 1]
  starty <- coord[nrow(coord), 2]
  endx <- ifelse (dir=="w", startx-step, ifelse(dir=="e", startx+step, startx))
  endy <- ifelse (dir=="n", starty+step, ifelse(dir=="s", starty-step, starty))
  newcoord <- data.frame (x=endx, y=endy, step=step)
  coord <- rbind(coord, newcoord)
}
rw <- ggplot(coord, aes(x=x, y=y))
rw + geom_path() + 
  ggtitle(paste(n, "walks")) + 
  geom_point(aes(x=0, y =0), color="green", size=I(5)) +
  geom_point(aes(x=endx, y =endy), color="red", size=I(5))

However, with n>10,000 it gets very slow, so would like to to avoid the loop and use some form of 'apply', but can't figure out how to add the values of coordinates from rows n and n-1. Please help, thank you.

# second solution
d <- data.frame(dir=sample(c("w", "e", "n", "s"), n, replace=T), step=sample(1:4, n, replace=T))
xy <- data.frame(x=0, y=0)
x. <- data.frame(x=with(d, ifelse (dir=="w", -step, ifelse(dir=="e", step, 0))))
y. <- data.frame(y=with(d, ifelse (dir=="s", -step, ifelse(dir=="n", step, 0))))
x.y. <- cbind(x.,y.)
xy <- rbind(xy, x.y.)
head(xy)
# ... stuck here
share|improve this question
3  
You tried cumsum(xy)? –  Rcoster Feb 14 '13 at 18:54
1  
If possible, don't replace the loop with an 'apply' method, since the 'apply' family of functions are actually loop wrappers. It's more important to move to a vectorized approach and restructure your problem as a total vector. If no one else pops up a solution shortly, I'll write one for you. –  Dinre Feb 14 '13 at 19:08
1  
You should also avoid the growth method you are using with rbind, since that requires constant reallocation of memory and can add quite a bit of time to late-run passes as n starts becoming large. Instead, define the whole data frame at the beginning. –  Dinre Feb 14 '13 at 19:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you are getting close. If you read the comments already posted you can make it much faster. So I recommend not looking at this:

n=10000
x.=sample(-4:4,n,rep=T)
y.=sample(-4:4,n,rep=T)
x=cumsum(x.)
y=cumsum(y.)

coord=data.frame(x,y)

Then plot exactly how you did:

rw <- ggplot(coord, aes(x=x, y=y))
rw + geom_path() + 
  ggtitle(paste(n, "walks")) + 
  geom_point(aes(x=0, y =0), color="green", size=I(5)) +
  geom_point(aes(x=startx, y =starty), color="red", size=I(5))

update: the plotting is quite slow for n bigger than 10^5. Maybe base graphics would be faster.

update2: this is almost exactly as slow/fast as joran's response.

share|improve this answer
1  
The code in the question walks only on horizontal or vertical, but this code walks on any of the possible 16 directions. –  utkuerd Feb 14 '13 at 19:22
    
utkuerd is totally right. Nice catch. –  Seth Feb 14 '13 at 19:30

data.table is fast for this kind of problem...

walk.dt.f<-function(n=10000L, stepsize=1L:4L) {
  # lookup table with direction vector info
  dir.dt<-data.table(dir=c("w", "e", "n", "s"), xdir=c(-1L,1L,0L,0L), ydir=c(0L,0L,1L,-1L), key="dir")

  # initial position for random walk table
  walk.ini.dt<-data.table(rowid=0L,dir="n",step=0L)

  # generate table with random walk info
  walk.dt<-rbindlist(list(data.table(rowid=1L:n, dir=sample(dir.dt[,dir],n,replace=T), step=sample(stepsize,n,replace=T)), walk.ini.dt))

  # join the two tables, and multiply the step info by the direction vectors
  setkey(walk.dt,dir)
  walk.dt[dir.dt,c("xstep","ystep"):=list(step*xdir,step*ydir)]

  # update the key and reorder the rows
  setkey(walk.dt,rowid)

  # update the walk info table with the cumulative position
  walk.dt[,c("x","y"):=list(cumsum(xstep),cumsum(ystep))]

}

system.time(walk.dt.f(10000L))
## user  system elapsed 
## 0       0       0 

system.time(walk.dt.f(1e6L))
## user  system elapsed
## 0.25    0.00    0.25

Edit: Set the starting position at (0,0)

share|improve this answer

Gah! In the hopes that this will further my goal of squashing out the stupid "for loops are inherently slow" canard for R, here is a re-working of your first version, still using a for loop that is more than 40x times faster.

I haven't even considered whether your implementation of a random walk makes sense at all. My point here is simply to point out how you could achieve the results of your original code, much much faster, while still using a "slow" for loop.

#My version
foo <- function(n){ 
    coord <- matrix(NA,nrow = n,ncol = 3) #origin
    coord[1,] <- c(0,0,0)
    dir <- sample(c("w", "e", "n", "s"), n,replace = TRUE) #random direction
    step <- sample(1:4, n,replace = TRUE) #how far to go in each walk
    for (i in 2:n){
      startx <- coord[i-1, 1]
      starty <- coord[i-1, 2]
      endx <- ifelse (dir[i]=="w", startx-step[i], ifelse(dir[i]=="e", startx+step[i], startx))
      endy <- ifelse (dir[i]=="n", starty+step[i], ifelse(dir[i]=="s", starty-step[i], starty))
      coord[i,] <- c(endx,endy,step[i])
    }
}

#Your version    
foo2 <- function(n){
    coord <- data.frame (x=0, y=0, step=0) #origin
    for (i in 1:n){
      dir <- sample(c("w", "e", "n", "s"), 1) #random direction
      step <- sample(1:4, 1) #how far to go in each walk
      startx <- coord[nrow(coord), 1]
      starty <- coord[nrow(coord), 2]
      endx <- ifelse (dir=="w", startx-step, ifelse(dir=="e", startx+step, startx))
      endy <- ifelse (dir=="n", starty+step, ifelse(dir=="s", starty-step, starty))
      newcoord <- data.frame (x=endx, y=endy, step=step)
      coord <- rbind(coord, newcoord)
    }
}


system.time(foo(10000))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.353   0.001   0.353 
> system.time(foo2(10000))
   user  system elapsed 
 11.374   2.061  13.308 

All I've done here is:

  1. STOP. USING. RBIND. And pre-allocate.
  2. Switch to matrices.
  3. Move sample calls outside of loop.
share|improve this answer
    
Great points, good advice, @joran. –  koenbro Feb 14 '13 at 21:39

Since you are trying a 2-D random walk, there are 4x4 possible displacements. You can encode them with numbers from 1 to 16. However in order to reduce the computation and map these encoded numbers into direction and displacement amount I played a little trick, I did not encoded the steps with 1:16, but with c(-7:0,4:11)

d <- sample(c(-7:0,4:11),n,replace=T)
delta <- d%%4+1
dir <- d%/%4
xd <- dir
xd[xd%%2 ==0]=0
yd <- dir
yd[xd%%2 ==1]=0
yd <- yd/2
x=c(0,xd*delta)
y=c(0,yd*delta)
x=cumsum(x)
y=cumsum(y)

coords<-data.frame(x,y)

This version only uses vectorized operations, has only a little overhead. I think it performs close to the data.table based solution given before.

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