Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following query

SELECT DISTINCT T_Med.Comp, T_Med.ItemID, T_Med.WP, T_Med.DocName, T_Med.TrfCode, 
       T_Med.CatDescr, T_Med.SubCatDescr, T_LKPWP.RuleCode, T_MedWP.RuleCode, 
       T_Med.Group
FROM (T_Med INNER JOIN T_LKPWP ON (T_Med.DocName=T_LKPWP.SDocName)
AND (T_Med.[WP]=T_LKPWP.WP)) 
LEFT JOIN T_MedWP ON T_LKPWP.RuleCode=T_MedWP.RuleCode
WHERE (((T_MedWP.RuleCode) Is Null));

Because of DISTINCT it takes long time to process. As I found out even though I created indexes for those relevant fields it doesn't help foe DISTINCT. Without DISTINCT same query give results less than one sec

Here T_Med has 1070065 records, T_MedWP has 366315 records and T_LKPWP has 55 records

Is there anyway of achieving the expected results in different way. I tried to create a separate table without DISTINCT, even that took longtime.

Appreciate your comments

share|improve this question
    
Have you examined the execution plan for the query? If so, are the new indexes actually being used? –  Fred Sobotka Feb 14 '13 at 19:22
    
Hi Fred, How to get the execution plan in ms access –  shabar Feb 14 '13 at 19:31
    
If you're using Jet, there's a JETSHOWPLAN registry setting, which produces a showplan.out file when enabled. –  Fred Sobotka Feb 14 '13 at 20:13

2 Answers 2

This is general Oracle example but maybe it gives you some idea. I do not know much about Access, sorry. Cannot be sure if operators as Exists available in Access.

-- Same as Distinct --
SELECT deptno, dname FROM scott.dept D WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT 'X' FROM scott.emp E WHERE E.deptno = D.deptno)
/
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Art, Can you explain how could I applied your query to my scenario. What stands for 'X' there –  shabar Feb 14 '13 at 21:58
    
@shabar - the X is any value. It does not matter what to select in subquery - X, 1 or null. The EXISTS operator returns TRUE if a sub-query returns at least one row. As soon as the first row in the subq. found it returns true and does not check any further returning distinct values. To help you with query I'd need tables and some time. I cannot crunch such things in my mind unfort. The idea here is to show you the way to avoid distinct. Check your queries separately, e.g. remove join and see where do you need to apply distinct and how to avoid this etc... Simplify, always keep it simple. –  Art Feb 15 '13 at 13:21
 SELECT DISTINCT Comp, ItemID, WP, DocName, TrfCode, 
   CatDescr, SubCatDescr, RuleCode, .RuleCode, 
   Group FROM (

 maybe try this...

 SELECT T_Med.Comp, T_Med.ItemID, T_Med.WP, T_Med.DocName, T_Med.TrfCode, 
   T_Med.CatDescr, T_Med.SubCatDescr, T_LKPWP.RuleCode, T_MedWP.RuleCode, 
   T_Med.Group
  FROM (T_Med INNER JOIN T_LKPWP ON (T_Med.DocName=T_LKPWP.SDocName)
   AND (T_Med.[WP]=T_LKPWP.WP)) 
   LEFT JOIN T_MedWP ON T_LKPWP.RuleCode=T_MedWP.RuleCode
   WHERE (((T_MedWP.RuleCode) Is Null));

  )

also check this one Query taking long time with DISTINCT

share|improve this answer
    
@Joe-use ctrl+K to enter code. –  Art Feb 14 '13 at 19:28
    
Thax Joe, I tried the given option. Still find same issue. Just wondering how many records will be there in the result if there is 'n' number of duplicates in T_Med and 'm' number of duplicates in T_MedWP table What can be the possible records That I should get when run the query with out DISTINCT. Because even If I go for count() it doesn't give out put (running for long time) How should I address this issue –  shabar Feb 14 '13 at 23:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.