Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create an class that represents an integer set using a HashSet<int>. I want it to keep track of which values are included in the set using that internal container. I've done this so far:

class SetInteger
{
    HashSet<int> intTest= new HashSet<int>();
    intTest.Add(1);
    intTest.Add(2);
    intTest.Add(3);
    intTest.Add(4);
    intTest.Add(5);
    intTest.Add(6);
    intTest.Add(7);
    intTest.Add(8);
    intTest.Add(9);
    intTest.Add(10);
}

So, here I think I'm adding some values to the HashSet, but I dont see how this can keep track of which values that are included in the set. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
HashSet also returns true or false on the .Add method telling you whether the item was successfully added or it already existed in the collection. –  Marc Feb 14 '13 at 19:19

5 Answers 5

HashSet has a Contains method that allows you to check whether a value is in the set.

In addition the HashSet implements the ISet<T> interface and therefore provides many methods for working with sets, such as union, intersection and determining if a set of values is a super- or subset of your set.

HashSet<int> intTest = new HashSet<int>()
{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };

bool has4 = intTest.Contains(4);    // Returns true
bool has11 = intTest.Contains(11);  // Returns false
bool result = intTest.IsSupersetOf(new []{ 4, 6, 7 }); // Returns true

By the way, did you know about the collection initializer syntax?


You can also foreach on the set to get each element it contains (in an unspecified order):

foreach(int value in intTest)
{
    // Do something with value.
}

Or convert it to an array or mutable list (also in an unspecified order):

int[] arr = intTest.ToArray();
List<int> lst = intTest.ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
You beat me to it. +1 –  p.s.w.g Feb 14 '13 at 19:15

You can use HashSet Contains method tell's if the value already exists!

Example :

if (intTest.Contains(5)
{
    // already has the value
}
share|improve this answer

Hmm...well, a HashSet<T> implements IEnumerable<T>, so you can always do this to figure out "What's already in there":

HashSet<int> intTest= new HashSet<int>();
intTest.Add(1);
intTest.Add(2);
intTest.Add(3);
intTest.Add(4);
intTest.Add(5);
intTest.Add(6);
intTest.Add(7);
intTest.Add(8);
intTest.Add(9);
intTest.Add(10);
var inThereNow = intTest.ToArray();  // [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

There's also bool Contains(T value) which will tell you if a specific value is in the set, IEnumerable<T> Union(IEnumerable<T> other) which will tell you the "OR" of two sets, IEnumerable<T> Intersect(IEnumerable<T> other) which will tell you the overlap of two sets...pretty much anything in either IEnumerable<T> or ISet<T>

share|improve this answer

Us the Contains method: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb356440.aspx

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

you can try this. you just take a one textbox and two button.

HashSet<int> hs = new HashSet<int>();
    private void savedataonhashSet_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        hs.Add(Convert.ToInt16(textBox1.Text));
   }

    private void checkduplicatevalue_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (hs.Contains(00))          

        {
            MessageBox.Show("it is");
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("not there");
        }
    }

if you again problem faced just drop your code .....

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.