Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a portion of a manufacturing DB. The business takes in custom orders and builds items to spec. They only build several (let's say 3-10) types of objects, but each type of object is different in the specifications that get recorded. I want to have a master manufacturing table (mfgorders) that lists some common fields and then have it refer to a specifications table that is specific to the entity ordered. I'm not entirely confident this is the right approach. In fact, I'm not confident at all. All of my other modelling has been straight forward, but this one is bugging me.

Here's the SQL:

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders (MfgOrderId int NOT NULL
                                       IDENTITY (1, 1) ,
                        OrderId int NOT NULL,
                        LineNbr tinyint NOT NULL,
                        MfgTypeId tinyint NOT NULL,
                        ItemDescription varchar (999) ,
                        ManufacturingCost smallmoney,
                        CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderId)) ;
--OrderId + LineNbr are a composite referencing a row on a lineitem table (not depicted here)

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity1 (MfgOrderId int NOT NULL,
                                EntitySize decimal (5, 3) ,
                                Width decimal (4, 2) ,
                                Thickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                                CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders_entity1 PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderId)) ;

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity2 (MfgOrderId int NOT NULL,
                                Height decimal (5, 2) ,
                                Width decimal (5, 2) ,
                                Thickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                                RotationSetting decimal (4, 1) ,
                                FinishedHeight decimal (5, 2) ,
                                FinishedWidth decimal (5, 2) ,
                                FinishedThickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                                CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders_entity2 PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderId)) ;

CREATE TABLE mfg_types (MfgTypeId tinyint NOT NULL,
                    ItemName varchar (32) NOT NULL,
                    ItemDescription nvarchar (64) NULL,
                    IsActive bit NOT NULL
                                 CONSTRAINT DF_mfg_types_IsActive DEFAULT 1,
                    SortOrder int NULL,
                    CONSTRAINT PK_mfg_types PRIMARY KEY (MfgTypeId)) ;

ALTER TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity1 ADD CONSTRAINT FK_mfgorders_entity1_mfgorders FOREIGN KEY (MfgOrderId) REFERENCES dbo.mfgorders (MfgOrderId) ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity2 ADD CONSTRAINT FK_mfgorders_entity2_mfgorders FOREIGN KEY (MfgOrderId) REFERENCES dbo.mfgorders (MfgOrderId) ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE dbo.mfgorders ADD CONSTRAINT FK_mfgorders_mfg_types FOREIGN KEY (MfgTypeId) REFERENCES dbo.mfg_types (MfgTypeId) ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE;

Here is an ER-diagram for the above code:

ER-diagram

The model implies that an entity1 and entity2 can have the same MfgOrderId and I don't want that of course. I want the MfgOrderId to refer to only one of the entities. I think in my mind I was hoping to utilize the mfg_types to point to the right entity table, but I feel the model is off and I'd add a few extra years to my life by asking the SO community.

Regards, John

share|improve this question
    
See answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/14910161/… –  Walter Mitty Feb 16 '13 at 18:42
    
An additional link that helped me very much: sqlteam.com/article/… –  secretwep Feb 28 '13 at 21:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What your design is expressing, or attempting to, is a Supertype and Subtype relationship.

One way to express this is to include the MfgTypeId field in each Entity table:

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity2 (MfgOrderId int NOT NULL,
                 MfgTypeId tinyint NOT NULL,
                 Height decimal (5, 2) ,
                 Width decimal (5, 2) ,
                 Thickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                 RotationSetting decimal (4, 1) ,
                 FinishedHeight decimal (5, 2) ,
                 FinishedWidth decimal (5, 2) ,
                 FinishedThickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                 CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders_entity2 PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderId, MfgTypeId),
                 CONSTRAINT chkEntity2_MfgTypeID CHECK (MfgTypeId = 'Type Id for Entity 2')) ;

I would probably also alter the MfgOrders table to include the MfgTypeId as part of the primary key as well.

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders (MfgOrderId int NOT NULL IDENTITY (1, 1) ,
                 MfgTypeId tinyint NOT NULL,                 
                 OrderId int NOT NULL,
                 LineNbr tinyint NOT NULL,
                 ItemDescription varchar (999) ,
                 ManufacturingCost smallmoney,
                 CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderId, MfgTypeId)) ;

If you search for Supertype & Subtype database modeling you'll find a number of resources, including questions on SO and the Stackexchange network. I've included a few links below which might help you get started with this:

  1. Supertype/Subtype on Database Administrators

  2. Supertypes & Subtypes

  3. how-to-implement-referential-integrity-in-subtypes

share|improve this answer
    
These are excellent links and now I'm back on track. Thank you! –  secretwep Feb 14 '13 at 20:46
    
@secretwep My pleasure. Good luck! –  Tim Lentine Feb 14 '13 at 21:06

"...and I don't want that of course."

I wouldn't necessarily jump to that conclusion. The model you're describing is an acceptable one, Hibernate calls it InheritanceType.JOINED. You can read about it in their docs, but you would model that relationship with all the tables sharing the same ID.

The JPA docs also talk about it.

The key part about using this, or indeed about representing a class hierarchy in the database in general, is that you need to be able to tell whether you have an entity1 or an entity2. The most well-defined way of doing this is with a Discriminator, basically a column in the superclass table that says whether any row represents an entity1 or an entity2.

I believe that if you don't specify a Discriminator, and you're using JOINED, then Hibernate (and perhaps other JPA implementations) will do it for you automatically by checking all subclass tables and seeing which one contains a row with a particular ID. Assuming every MfgOrderId is in one and only one subclass table, this would work for you without changing your schema.

EDIT

I mistakenly switched TABLE_PER_CLASS, I meant JOINED!

share|improve this answer
1  
I think the OP was expressing a business concern that a single MfgOrderId can only be of type Entity 1 OR of type Entity 2, but not both. –  Tim Lentine Feb 14 '13 at 19:35
    
@Tim That is the correct business concern. –  secretwep Feb 14 '13 at 19:37
    
@TimLentine ah, got it. I'll update my answer to include discriminators –  sharakan Feb 14 '13 at 19:38
1  
@secretwep Note that you obviously don't HAVE to do it this way, but it definitely looks to me like mfgOrder relates to entity1 and entity2 as a superclass, not a container. –  sharakan Feb 14 '13 at 19:42
    
@sharakan 'discriminator column' is exactly the terminology I was lacking. I'm using SQLServer2008 and I'll update the tags if I can. I'll get back to this topic soon. –  secretwep Feb 14 '13 at 20:09

I can't see any major problems with what you've got. Here is what I would probably do:

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders (    MfgOrderId int NOT NULL IDENTITY (1, 1),
                            OrderId int NOT NULL,
                            LineNbr tinyint NOT NULL,
                            MfgTypeId tinyint NOT NULL,
                            ItemDescription varchar (999) ,
                            ManufacturingCost smallmoney,
                            CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderId)) ;
--OrderId + LineNbr are a composite referencing a row on a lineitem table (not depicted here)

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity1( MfgOrderEntity1Id int NOT NULL IDENTITY (1, 1),
                                MfgOrderId int NOT NULL,
                                EntitySize decimal (5, 3) ,
                                Width decimal (4, 2) ,
                                Thickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                                CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders_entity1 PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderEntity1Id)) ;

CREATE TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity2 (MfgOrderEntity2Id int NOT NULL IDENTITY (1, 1),
                                MfgOrderId int NOT NULL,
                                Height decimal (5, 2) ,
                                Width decimal (5, 2) ,
                                Thickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                                RotationSetting decimal (4, 1) ,
                                FinishedHeight decimal (5, 2) ,
                                FinishedWidth decimal (5, 2) ,
                                FinishedThickness decimal (4, 2) ,
                                CONSTRAINT PK_mfgorders_entity2 PRIMARY KEY (MfgOrderEntity2Id)) ;

CREATE TABLE mfg_types (            MfgTypeId tinyint NOT NULL,
                                ItemName varchar (32) NOT NULL,
                                ItemDescription nvarchar (64) NULL,
                                IsActive bit NOT NULL
                                CONSTRAINT DF_mfg_types_IsActive DEFAULT 1,
                                SortOrder int NULL,
                                CONSTRAINT PK_mfg_types PRIMARY KEY (MfgTypeId)) ;

ALTER TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity1 ADD CONSTRAINT FK_mfgorders_entity1_mfgorders FOREIGN KEY (MfgOrderId) REFERENCES dbo.mfgorders (MfgOrderId) ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE dbo.mfgorders_entity2 ADD CONSTRAINT FK_mfgorders_entity2_mfgorders FOREIGN KEY (MfgOrderId) REFERENCES dbo.mfgorders (MfgOrderId) ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE dbo.mfgorders ADD CONSTRAINT FK_mfgorders_mfg_types FOREIGN KEY (MfgTypeId) REFERENCES dbo.mfg_types (MfgTypeId) ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE;
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm curious, as a step towards normalization, why not combine entity1 & entity2? You have duplicate fields in both: Width & Thickness. It kind of depends on your business logic and how often you utilize the fields, but pulling from table rather than joining two together should get you some performance and decreased db size. Even if the the thickness and width fields contain different data across the two tables, it may still be worth your time to rename them in one table and consolidate. –  RandomUs1r Feb 14 '13 at 19:49
    
@Syn123 I appreciate the sentiments you expressed and will take it under advisement. The selected answer of [link]dba.stackexchange.com/questions/16543/… , a link Tim provided above, had similar reflections about using a single-table design. –  secretwep Feb 14 '13 at 20:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.