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My html looks like this:

<div id="container">
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
</div>

Then in javascript I set a click listener in the document ready function:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.sub').click(function (event) {
        //do something
    });
});

Later on I dynamically add more .class elements so my html looks like:

<div id="container">
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>

    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
    <div class="sub"></div>
</div>

And I add the click listeners again:

function addListeners(){
  $('.sub').click(function (event) {
        //do something
    });
}

Now the first four .sub elements have two click handlers attached and they fire twice when clicked. Is there a better way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can delegate the event:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('#container').on('click', '.sub', function(event) {
        //do something
    });
});
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2  
Indeed, this is what delegation is for –  Jan Dvorak Feb 14 '13 at 19:37
1  
delegation it is. @jose-calderon this is not what you asked for, but this is what you should do in such cases. delegation attaches event handler to all items under the provided root element, even the new ones. –  simplyharsh Feb 14 '13 at 19:48

You should use On() instead of click() here in this case.So , your code gets

function addListeners(){
  $('#container').on('click','.sub',function (event) {
        //do something
    });
}

The difference between .on() and .click() would be that .click() may not work when the DOM elements associated with the .click() event are added dynamically at a later point while .on() can be used in situations where the DOM elements associated with the .on() call may be generated dynamically at a later point.

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on != "delegation". It is possible to use on but not delegate. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 14 '13 at 19:42
    
@JanDvorak Oh yes..just changed that line... –  Bhushan Firake Feb 14 '13 at 19:43
    
Most of the answer still seems to imply on = delegation. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 14 '13 at 19:46

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