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I've been developing Backbone applications for a little while now, and am just starting to learn to use Backbone with Require.js.

In my backbone app that I am refactoring, I defined a namespace like this: App.model.repo. This model is used over and over again in different views. I do the same thing with a few collections, for example, App.collection.files. These models and collections are bootstrapped in with the initial index file request.

I did find this example, which looks like a great way to get that bootstrapped data in. However, I am struggling with the best way to reuse/share these models and collection between views.

I can think of three possible solutions. Which is best and why? Or is there another solution I am missing entirely?

Solution 1

Define these common modules and collections in the index (when they are bootstrapped in), and then pass them along to each Backbone view as an option (of initialize).

define(['jquery', 'underscore', 'backbone', 'handlebars', 'text!templates/NavBar.html'], 
    function($, _, Backbone, Handlebars, template){     
        return Backbone.View.extend({
            template: Handlebars.compile(template),
            initialize: function(options){
                this.repoModel = options.repoModel; // common model passed in
            }
        });
    }
);

These seems clean as far as separation, but could get funky quick, with tons of things being passed all over the place.

Solution 2

Define a globals module, and add commonly used models and collections to it.

// models/Repo.js
define(['backbone'],
    function(Backbone){
        return Backbone.Model.extend({
            idAttribute: 'repo_id'
        });
    }
);

// globals.js (within index.php, for bootstrapping data)
define(['underscore', 'models/Repo'], 
    function(_, RepoModel){     
        var globals = {};

        globals.repoModel = new Repo(<?php echo json_encode($repo); ?>);

        return globals
    }
);

define(['jquery', 'underscore', 'backbone', 'handlebars', 'text!templates/NavBar.html', 'globals'], 
    function($, _, Backbone, Handlebars, template, globals){
        var repoModel = globals.repoModel; // repoModel from globals

        return Backbone.View.extend({
            template: Handlebars.compile(template),
            initialize: function(options){

            }
        });
    }
);

Does this solution defeat the whole point of AMD?

Solution 3

Make some models and collections return an instance, instead of a constructor (effectively making them Singletons).

// models/repo.js
define(['backbone'],
    function(Backbone){
        // return instance
        return new Backbone.Model.extend({
            idAttribute: 'repo_id'
        });
    }
);

// Included in index.php for bootstrapping data
require(['jquery', 'backbone', 'models/repo', 'routers/Application'],
    function($, Backbone, repoModel, ApplicationRouter){
        repoModel.set(<?php echo json_encode($repo); ?>);

        new ApplicationRouter({el: $('.site-container')});
        Backbone.history.start();
    }
);

define(['jquery', 'underscore', 'backbone', 'handlebars', 'text!templates/NavBar.html', 'models/repo'], 
    function($, _, Backbone, Handlebars, template, repoModel){
        // repoModel has values set by index.php

        return Backbone.View.extend({
            template: Handlebars.compile(template),
            initialize: function(options){

            }
        });
    }
);

This I worry could get real confusing about what is a constructor and what is an instance.

End

If you read this far, you are awesome! Thanks for taking the time.

share|improve this question
    
I tried both option 1 and 3, by refactoring my existing app. Option 1 quickly got hairy, with options being passed everywhere, often through one module that did not need it all all, just to get to a child module that did need it. In the end, option 3 feels much cleaner to me. Truth be told, I am using all 3 of these options in my current project. Option 1 for short lifecycle elements. Option 2 for simple things like "apiUrl" (common root url). Option 3 for backbone models and collections that are used project wide. –  Bart Feb 21 '13 at 17:03
    
Tangentially related: stackoverflow.com/a/15528785/158651 –  Bart Mar 20 '13 at 16:06
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In my case, I prefer option 3. Although, to prevent confusion, I put every singleton instance in their own folder named instances. Also, I tend to separate the model/collection from the instance module.

Then, I just call them in:

define([
  "instance/photos"
], function( photos ) { /* do stuff */ });

I prefer this option as every module is forced to define its dependencies (which is not the case via namespace for example). The solution 2 could do the job, but if I'm using AMD, I want my module as small as possible - plus keeping them small make it easier to unit test.

And lastly, about unit test, I can just re-define the instance inside my unit test to use mock data. So, definitely, option 3.

You can see an example of this pattern on an Open source app I'm working on ATM: https://github.com/iplanwebsites/newtab-bookmarks/tree/master/app

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of an instances folder. That could work. From looking at this code, it appear that your app is essentially your globals, right? This seems closer to Option 2. –  Bart Feb 14 '13 at 20:11
    
Yes and no, app is a global object and is always call. But, it is not used as a namespace and it only return some generic helper functions; it set global configurations which are used all over the place (Layout Manager and i18n library normally). In a perfect world, I wouldn't use the app module and I'd set library config inside the require.config, but unfortunately, RequireJS only support init for shim modules. –  Simon Boudrias Feb 14 '13 at 20:26
1  
Oh hey, just saw what you meant. Didn't realize this project was using app as a namespace. I was doing this in the past, but I'm not anymore as this wasn't flexible enough, so this is kind of a relicat. If you look where instances/settings is used, you'll see that it only use the return value, not the namespace. –  Simon Boudrias Feb 14 '13 at 20:29
    
I also prefer option 3 for readability. Since you can see the path to the model that you are instantiating, you know exactly what the model is and what behavior to expect from it. –  andyzinsser Feb 15 '13 at 16:56
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I would take a look at this example repo https://github.com/tbranyen/github-viewer

It is a working example of backbone boiler plate (https://github.com/tbranyen/backbone-boilerplate)

Backbone Boiler plate does a lot of unnecessary fluff, but what is really useful about it, is that it gives some clear directions on common patterns for developing complex javascript apps.

I'll try and come back later today to answer you question more specifically (if someone doesn't beat me to it :)

share|improve this answer
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I prefer Solution 1. It is generally good to avoid using singletons, and using globals is also something to avoid, especially since you are using RequireJS.

Here are some advantages I can think of for Solution 1:

It makes the view code more readable. Someone looking at the module for the first time can immediately see from looking at the initialize function which models it uses. If you use globals, something might be accessed 500 lines down in the file.

It makes it easier to write unit tests for the view code. Since you could possibly pass in fake models in your tests.

share|improve this answer
    
Great points. Thanks. –  Bart Feb 14 '13 at 21:38
1  
I actually agree with Paul's perspective. Using option 1 allows you to easily test any Backbone related objects and allows it to be extremely readable as all of your code is split up into multiple modules and objects etc. The point I'd want to add though to option 1 is that it helps enforce the pub / sub model of backbone. Using event driven is much better than calling the function directly! –  amchang87 Feb 15 '13 at 3:29
1  
I disagree on your readability point. this.repoModel is getting set to options.repoModel. We have no way of knowing what is in options as well as what options.repoModel is? In order to figure out what is in options and options.repoModel, we have to track down the code that is instantiating this module. I may be off a bit on this assumption, but since bart is using require, why pass around modules through functions? –  andyzinsser Feb 15 '13 at 17:02
    
I have the same feeling as @andyzinsser on this one. Although I agree to some of what you said (about singletons) and that dependency injection is a good pattern. I must say that always relying on this can make code harder to read an comprehend as you have to track down the initialization of a module to know for sure what's his model. This is good when the model is a variable (a view for each model in a collection), but it don't replace "global" objects (in any type of pattern). –  Simon Boudrias Feb 15 '13 at 17:06
    
You are not passing around modules, but instances of modules. I agree it can be confusing at times, since Backbone takes the model:instanceOfModel out of options behind the scenes. But if you pass multiple models and hook them up in initialize manually, as @SimonBoudrias was showing in his code, then it is more readable, since you can look at initialize and see which models the view is using. Knowing what is in options is a job for documentation, and with either of the 3 solutions it is an issue, but at least with solution 1 it forces it to be clearer and more reusable. IMO :) –  Paul Hoenecke Feb 15 '13 at 18:51
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