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Hello basically it is a question of OO programming in perl. I want to have two objects A and B, and A contains a member variable which of type B. I did some tests but seems it doesn't work. Any idea?

a.pm

package a;


sub new{
    my $self = {};
    my $b = shift;
    $self->{B} = $b;
    bless $self;
    return $self;
}

sub doa{
    my $self = shift;
    print "a\n";
    $self->{B}->dob;
}

1;

b.pm

package b;

sub new {
    my $self = {};
    bless $self;
    return $self;
}

sub dob{
    my $self = shift;
    print "b\n";
} 



1;

test.pl

use a;
use b;

my $b = b->new;
my $a = a->new($b);
$a->doa;

When I ran this, it shows:

a
Can't locate object method "dob" via package "a" at a.pm line 16.
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You forgot about the method's first parameter. The first parameter of a method is always the invocant.

sub new {
    my ($class, $b) = @_;
    my $self = {};
    $self->{B} = $b;
    return bless($self, $class);
}

I usually bless first, though

sub new {
    my ($class, ...) = @_;
    my $self = bless({}, $class);
    $self->{attribute} = ...;
    return $self;
}

because it's more consistent with the constructor of a derived class.

sub new {
    my ($class, ...) = @_;
    my $self = $class->SUPER::new(...);
    $self->{attribute} = ...;
    return $self;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Added a style note to my answer. –  ikegami Feb 17 '13 at 10:15

You might want to make Perl OO easier by using something like Moose or its lighter cousin Moo. Also you might like the (free) Modern Perl Book to learn about the many new and exciting thing that more modern Perl has to offer!

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

package ClassA;

use Moo;

has 'b' => (
  is => 'ro',
  isa => sub { shift->isa('ClassB') or die "Need a ClassB\n" },  # not necessary but handy
  required => 1,
);

sub doa {
    my $self = shift;
    print "a\n";
    $self->b->dob;
}

package ClassB;

use Moo;

sub dob {
  my $self = shift;
  print "b\n";
}

package main;

my $b = ClassB->new;
my $a = ClassA->new( b => $b );
$a->doa;

In fact, depending on what you want, perhaps you even might want something like delegation:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

package ClassA;

use Moo;

has 'b' => (
  is => 'ro',
  isa => sub { shift->isa('ClassB') or die "Need a ClassB\n" },  # not necessary but handy
  required => 1,
  handles => ['dob'],
);

sub doa {
    my $self = shift;
    print "a\n";
}

package ClassB;

use Moo;

sub dob {
  my $self = shift;
  print "b\n";
}

package main;

my $b = ClassB->new;
my $a = ClassA->new( b => $b );
$a->doa;
$a->dob;
share|improve this answer
    
Couldn't you change the "isa" to isa => 'ClassB',? –  gpojd Feb 14 '13 at 21:01
    
If you are using Moose, but not in Moo. Its one of the few differences, and honestly I usually omit the isa check when using Moo. –  Joel Berger Feb 14 '13 at 21:03

You are not blessing your objects properly. Try this:

A:

sub new {                                                                                                                                                                                               
    my $class = shift;                                                                                                                                                                                 
    my $b = shift;                                                                                                                                                                                     
    return bless { B => $b }, $class;                                                                                                                                                                  
}  

B:

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    return bless {}, $class; 
} 
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