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Suppose I have a file as following:

101 abcd <time>
106 efgh <time>
107 ijkl <time>
110 pqrs <time>
105 trsf <time>
101 yrte <time>
109 tyti <time>
110 tyui <time>

I want to do some operations on the chunk of lines starting from 101 and ends at 110. I'm able to solve it when there is only one occurance of 101 and 110 in a file.

sed -ne 's/101/,/110/p' file1 > file2

With this command I can take out the chunk of lines I want to work upon. Please help me to find the logic where I will be able to save the first chunk in first file, second matched lines in second file and so on.

I'm writing the script in AIX.

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I'm guessing s shouldn't be in that sed script? –  Lev Levitsky Feb 14 '13 at 20:57
    
Hi Lev, yes, s should not be there.. –  user2073484 Mar 13 '13 at 22:07
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do:

awk '/^101/ && !i { c++; i=1 } i { print > "file" c } /^110/ { i=0 }' input

This simply increments a counter (c) each time a line matches ^101, but only if not already in a block being printed. The second clause prints to an output file with the counter in the name if appropriate, and the third clase turns off the flag (i) that is used to determine if the current line is in a block to be printed.

Another option is to simply do:

awk '/^101/,/^110/{ print > "output" c } /^110/{c++}' c=1 input
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Thanks William, It worked.. :) –  user2073484 Mar 13 '13 at 22:08
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you could try with awk, here is a short one-liner to do that job:

awk '/101/{++i;f=1} f{print $0>"file"i} /110/{f=0}' file

test with your example:

kent$  echo "101 abcd <time>
106 efgh <time>
107 ijkl <time>
110 pqrs <time>
105 trsf <time>
101 yrte <time>
109 tyti <time>
110 tyui <time>"|awk '/101/{++i;f=1} f{print $0>"file"i} /110/{f=0}'

kent$  head *
==> file1 <==
101 abcd <time>
106 efgh <time>
107 ijkl <time>
110 pqrs <time>

==> file2 <==
101 yrte <time>
109 tyti <time>
110 tyui <time>
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