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I have a table that keeps track of the schedule of vehicles comings and goings.

Table: Schedule
route  location    v_type    out                  in
===================================================================
a      loc1        10      2/14/2013 08:04:00   2/14/2013 10:03:00
b      loc1        11      2/14/2013 08:06:00   2/14/2013 14:20:00
c      loc2        11      2/14/2013 06:22:00   2/14/2013 07:50:00
d      loc1        10      2/14/2013 11:04:00   2/14/2013 10:03:00
e      loc2        10      2/14/2013 08:06:00   2/14/2013 14:20:00
f      loc2        11      2/14/2013 06:22:00   2/14/2013 07:50:00

Imagine this but thousands of routes a day. I'm trying to find out for each location, and v_type what is the time (or window of time) that the most vehicles would be on the road.

Desired results e.g.

location    v_type   time            peak
===========================================
loc1        10       2/14/2013 10:40 110
loc1        11       2/14/2013 10:30 80
loc2        10       2/14/2013 08:05 67
loc2        11       2/14/2013 09:45 107

etc.

The basic idea is you can find the number of vehicles on the road at any point in time by finding the total number of vehicles that have left, and subtracting the number of vehicles that have come back for the current day.

This is what I have so far, but it isn't working exactly correctly, and is slow.

SELECT s.location,
  s.v_type,
  TO_CHAR(TRUNC(s.out, 'mi') - mod(EXTRACT(minute FROM CAST(s.out AS TIMESTAMP)), 10) / (24 * 60), 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI') AS TIME,
  (SELECT
    (SELECT COUNT(*)
     FROM SCHEDULE s2
     WHERE s2.out BETWEEN TRUNC(s.out) AND (TRUNC(s.out, 'mi') - mod(EXTRACT(minute  FROM CAST(s.out AS TIMESTAMP)), 10) / (24 * 60))
    )                                                          
    -
    (SELECT COUNT(*)
     FROM SCHEDULE s2
     WHERE s2.out BETWEEN TRUNC(s.in) AND (TRUNC(s.in, 'mi') - mod(EXTRACT(minute FROM CAST(s.in AS TIMESTAMP)), 10) / (24 * 60))
    )
 FROM dual
 )
 FROM SCHEDULE s
 GROUP BY s.location, s.v_type,
 (TRUNC(s.out, 'mi') - mod(EXTRACT(minute FROM CAST(s.out AS TIMESTAMP)), 10) / (24 * 60))
share|improve this question
    
It would be much easier to help you if you post sample tables and data and I mean create/insert scripts. I cannot crunch such things in my mind unfort. for me... –  Art Feb 14 '13 at 21:23
    
I'm googling, but is there an easy way to do that from SQLDeveloper? –  Plecebo Feb 14 '13 at 21:54
    
@Plecebo-what I meant was in addition to your examples you should always build structures with data as in your examples, e.g. create table... insert into... This would help to test queries and to help you better and faster. I do not have time creating, populating structures for anyone, sorry. I do not know why people assume that it is easy to crunch such problems mentally or someone should create tables and data for them... –  Art Feb 15 '13 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

I would look at this as the difference between cumulative amounts:

select s.*
from (select s.*, (numout - numin) as onroad,
             row_number() over (partition by loc, vtype order by numout - numin desc) as seqnum
      from (select s.*,
                   (select count(*) from schedule s2 where s2.loc = s.loc and s2.vtype = s.vtype and s2.out <= s.out
                   ) as numout,
                   (select count(*) from schedule s2 where s2.loc = s.loc and s2.vtype = s.vtype and and s2.in <= s.out
                   ) as numin
            from schedule s
           ) s
     ) s
where seq = 1

You can also do this with analytic functions, but the correlated subquery is probably easier to write. Also, you started down this path.

share|improve this answer
    
This is fairly close, but only finds the vehicles on the road at a specific time. How would one make this find the 'busiest' time for each location/type combo? –  Plecebo Feb 14 '13 at 22:51
    
@Plecebo . . . The row_number() function does exactly that. Only the rows with the largest amount are kept. Actually, only one of them is. If there are ties, then you would want to use rank() or dense_rank() rather than row_number(). –  Gordon Linoff Feb 15 '13 at 0:38

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