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I am going to have a lecture on OpenMP and I want to write an program using OpenMP lively . What program do you suggest that has the most important concept of OpenMP and has noticeable speedup? I want an awesome program example, please help me all of you that you are expert in OpenMP you know I am looking for an technical and Interesting example with nice output.

I want to write two program lively , first one for better illustration of most important OpenMP concept and has impressive speedup and second-one as a hands-on that everyone must write that code at the same time

my audience may be very amateur

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Multiply two very very large matrices. –  gaganbm Feb 14 '13 at 22:01
    
@talonmies : thank you for editing –  Farzad Salimi Jazi Feb 15 '13 at 5:49
    
An N-body problem - not an embarrassingly parallel problem and you get decent (though not perfect) scaling and have to use parallel loops, reductions and atomic updates. –  Hristo Iliev Feb 15 '13 at 20:07

2 Answers 2

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(1) Matrix multiply

Perhaps it's the most simple example (though matrix addition would be simpler).

(2) Mandelbrot

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set

Mandelbrot is also embarrassingly parallel, and OpenMP can achieve decent speedups. You can even use graphics to visualize it. Mandelbrot is also an interesting example because it has workload imbalance. You may see different speedups based on scheduling policies (e.g., schedule(dynamic,1) vs. schedule(static)), and different threading libraries (e.g., Cilk Plus or TBB).

(3) A couple of mathematical kernels

For example, FFT (non-recursive version) is also embarrassingly parallelized.

Take a look at "OmpSCR" benchmarks: http://sourceforge.net/projects/ompscr/ This suite has simple OpenMP examples.

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Personally I wouldn't say that the most impressive aspect of OpenMP is the scalability of the codes you can write with it. I'd say that a more impressive aspect is the ease with which one can take an existing serial program and, with only a few OpenMP directives, turn it into a parallel program with satisfactory scalability.

So I'd suggest that you take any program (or part of any program) of interest to your audience, better yet a program your audience is familiar with, and parallelise it right there and then in your lecture, lively as you put it. I'd be impressed if a lecturer could show me, say, a 4 times speedup on 8 cores with 5 minutes coding and a re-compilation. And that leads on to all sorts of interesting topics about why you don't (always, easily) get 8 times speedup on 8 cores.

Of course, like all stage illusionists, you'll have to choose your example carefully and rehearse to ensure that you do get an impressive-enough speedup to support your argument.

Personally I'd be embarrassed to use an embarrassingly parallel program for such a demo; the more perceptive members of the audience might be provoked into a response such as meh.

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thank you for helpful response .what example do you offer that it has these characteristic ? I want to write two program lively , first one for better illustration of most important OpenMP concept that have impressive speedup and second-one as a hands-on that everyone must write that code at the same time . –  Farzad Salimi Jazi Feb 15 '13 at 20:40

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